(E-E) Ev.g.e.n.i.j ..K.o.z.l.o.     Berlin                                                  


      (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov: Leningrad 80s • No.115 >>

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection • Harvard University

USA-CCCP. Points of Contact.
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov – Catherine Mannick
Correspondence 1979 – 1990

4. The End of Censorship

It is usually considered that censorship was the main obstacle to free expression in the Soviet Union – and other communist states, for that matter - but in the case of Evgenij Kozlov’s oeuvre from the 1980s, it makes sense to distinguish between censorship in a stricter sense, concerning restrictions on style and subject matter, and censorship in a wider sense, concerning the fact that without a diploma of a higher art school, he was denied the status of a professional artist on formal grounds.

Censorship in the stricter sense didn’t apply to his artistic quest. At the beginning of 1982, he noted in his diary:

    I have achieved a state of performance where I'm completely free and absolutely audacious.
    Completely free with respect to creation, absolutely audacious with respect to forms. (Diary III, p. 3-16)

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, Diary III, pp 16, 17, beginning of 1982. Page 17, top: Пьер Карден  /Фр./. Костюмы к балету «Чайка». 1982 г. / Муз. Р. Щедрина / Нина Заречная – М. Плисецкая (Pierre Cardin / France/. Costumes for the ballet Chaika [The Seagull], 1982.[5] Music R. Shchedrin / Nina Zavernaya – M Plisetskaya more >> Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection • Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, Diary III, pp 16, 17, beginning of 1982.

Page 16, central paragraph:

- Добился состояния работоспособности, при котором полностью свободен и абсолютно смел. / I have achieved a state of performance where I'm completely free and absolutely audacious.

– Творчески П.С. [полностью свободен] / – Completely free with respect to creation,

– А.С. в формах [абсолютно смел]/ – Absolutely audacious with respect to forms. more >>

Page 17: see previous chapter, 3. Perestroika Emissaries

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection • Harvard University




By contrast, censorship in the wider sense considerably hindered his artistic expression. Being considered an “amateur” artist, the Law on Social Parasitism obliged him to enrol in official jobs, mostly as a graphic designer,[1] which had a serious impact on his creativity. In the same diary, a year later, he referred to those less than ideal conditions:

    23/1/83. A month has passed since I started working at Nizino. I have my own workshop and a lot of work to do. My back gets tired from leaning over the table all the time. I‘m wasting my time and energy on lettering and on pasting clippings from posters to plywood. It’s the same routine every day, and in the end it all has to be thrown away or remade a year later, at most. It’s time spent for nothing, a style of art as propaganda.

    Art has lost its pace, the number of paintings and graphic works has dropped so much that I’m constantly worrying about the future, feeling guilty about myself and in front of people. (Diary III, p. 3-75-76 more >>)

Paradoxically, his art, though often out of the ordinary, rarely came into conflict with censorship when shown publicly. Kozlov participated in public group exhibitions where the number of works by a single artist was never very large, and if Leningrad’s municipal censorship board, the Municipal Exhibition Committee (gorodskoi vystavkom),[2] did not admit a particular work, there was always another one to substitute it.[3]

This doesn't mean that Kozlov selected his works for public exhibitions at random. In his diary, there is an example from 1983, which comprises several possible lists for the second exhibition of The Society for Experimental Visual Art, or TEII, an association of independent artists founded in 1982. Catherine Mannick visited the opening and took pictures of the exhibits; digital images of the slides, together with her personal invitation card, are now at the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection (see Letter E, May 1983). The pictures show that the final selection included works from different years, among them three compositions from 1982 painted on pages from a chasoslov – a Horologion or book of hours – from the nineteenth century. At first glance, it seems surprising that these works should have passed censorship, but it can be explained. The following quote is from an article from 2021:

    Contemporary works stimulated by an Orthodox liturgical book would hardly have been admitted by Leningrad's municipal exhibition committee – or to any other Soviet exhibition in 1983. But in those three works documented at the exhibition, the printed text is entirely covered by the compositions. In fact, the painted surface extents to the very borders of a sheet, thus covering the catchword, too. Yet it would be wrong to consider these full-page compositions to be a case of self-censorship. While Kozlov often left a catchword visible, especially when it gave a work its title, there are also quite a few ‘full page’ compositions. It is plausible that he selected from those if he wished to avoid a conflict with the exhibition committee. What is more, he presented the three folios mounted on paper and put inside a frame, which means that the printed text on the reverse was also covered. Besides, biblical connotations are not obvious in most compositions either, since Kozlov created non-canonical narrations.[4]

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Untitled or Свет /Light Лист V / Folio V from The Peterhof Book of Hours series, 1982  Picture taken by Catherine Mannick on 5 April, 1983, during the opening of The Second TEII Exhibition, Leningrad Palace of the Youth (Ленинградский дворец молодёжи, ЛДМ, Leningradskii dvorets molodezhi, LDM).  Digitised slide image: Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Untitled or Свет /Light Лист V / Folio V from The Peterhof Book of Hours series, Scan image  Gouache, tempera, watercolour, aluminium powder on paper, 33.5 x 22.5 cm, 1982  E-E archival number: E-E-182016

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Untitled or Свет /Light
Лист V / Folio V from The Peterhof Book of Hours series, 1982

Picture taken by Catherine Mannick on 5 April, 1983, during the opening of The Second TEII Exhibition, Leningrad Palace of the Youth (Ленинградский дворец молодёжи, ЛДМ, Leningradskii dvorets molodezhi, LDM).

Digitised slide image: Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Untitled or Свет /Light
Лист V / Folio V from The Peterhof Book of Hours series,
Scan image more >> and more >>

Gouache, tempera, watercolour, aluminium powder on paper,
33.5 x 22.5 cm, 1982

E-E archival number: E-E-182016
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Untitled or Свет /Light Лист V / Folio V from The Peterhof Book of Hours series, Reverse with catchword at the top Gouache, tempera, watercolour, aluminium powder on paper, 33.5 x 22.5 cm, 1982  E-E archival number: E-E-182016  (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Untitled or Свет /Light Лист V / Folio V from The Peterhof Book of Hours series, Detail Gouache, tempera, watercolour, aluminium powder on paper, 33.5 x 22.5 cm, 1982  E-E archival number: E-E-182016

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Untitled or Свет /Light
Лист V / Folio V from The Peterhof Book of Hours series,
Reverse with catchword at the top more >>
Gouache, tempera, watercolour, aluminium powder on paper,
33.5 x 22.5 cm, 1982

E-E archival number: E-E-182016

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Untitled or Свет /Light
Лист V / Folio V from The Peterhof Book of Hours series,
Detail
Gouache, tempera, watercolour, aluminium powder on paper,
33.5 x 22.5 cm, 1982

E-E archival number: E-E-182016




Two examples of censorship at public exhibitions, both from 1985, have been documented for E-E Kozlov's work. The first concerns his painted photo-collage polyptych “Good Evening Gustav” from 1984, which wasn’t admitted at the 6th TEII Exhibition in May 1985.[5] The 20-part zigzag-fold, mentioned in the previous chapter, pays homage to Georgy “Gustav” Guryanov. Stylistically, it belongs to Kozlov’s “New Wave” period described in the introduction to Letter G, September 1984.[6]


The Ballet of the Three Inserapable Ones, Pictures by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, 1985. Room with a window, Left wall Five works by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  E-E-pho-BD65 "Teddy Boys". During the performance Балет Трех Неразлучников / The Ballet of the Three Inseparable Ones, Erik Goroshevsky Theatre, Leningrad, 1984 Photo collages by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Top: E-E-184006, Triptych, untitled Timur Novikov gave this work to the Russian Museum in 1991 Bottom: E-E-184003 „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“ ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’ Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984   E-E-184006 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Untitled Left part of triptych. Photo collage on cardboard, 86.5 x 64.5 cm, 1984   E-E-184006 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Untitled Central part of triptych. Photo collage on cardboard, 86.5 x 64.5 cm, 1984   E-E-184006 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Untitled Right part of triptych. Photo collage on cardboard, 86.5 x 64.5 cm, 1984   E-E-pho-BD21 Collages by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov: Top: two small collages with Georgy Guryanov (E-E-184031, E-E-pho-BJ54-opc) and untitled triptych (E-E-184006) Bottom: E-E-184003 „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“ ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’ Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984 Bottom left: painting by?, obviously not part of the exhibition   Top very left E-E-184031 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Painted vintage print and collage on cardborad with Georgy Guryanov, approx. 30 x 20 cm, ca. 1984   E-E-184031 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Painted vintage print and collage on cardborad with Georgy Guryanov, approx. 30 x 20 cm, ca. 1984 A picture from 1984 presents the upper part of the collage. Kozlov took it at his Peterhof "Gallaxy Gallery" studio   Top left E-E-pho-BJ54-opc (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Painted vintage print and collage on cardboard with Georgy Guryanov and young woman, approx. 23 x 17 cm, ca. 1984 This work was exhibited at the ASSA gallery, in 1984. See below.   E-E-pho-BJ54-opc (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Painted vintage print and collage on cardboard with Georgy Guryanov and young woman, approx. 23 x 17 cm, ca. 1984 This work was exhibited at the ASSA gallery in 1984. more >>   E-E-184003 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“ ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’ Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984 part 1 Georgy Guryanov and Ivetta Pomerantseva   E-E-184003 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“ ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’ Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984 part 2 Georgy Guryanov and Ivetta Pomerantseva   E-E-184003 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“ ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’ Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984 part 3 Georgy Guryanov and Ivetta Pomerantseva   E--E-184003 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“ ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’ Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984 part 4 Georgy Guryanov and Ivetta Pomerantseva   E-E-184003 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“ ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’ Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984 part 5 Georgy Guryanov and Ivetta Pomerantseva   E-E-184003 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“ ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’ Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984 part 6 Ivetta Pomerantseva and Georgy Guryanov   E-E-pho-BI41 Valery Alakhov, Ulyana Tseitlina (Ceytlina) and Timur Novikov left: fragment of collage triptych (E-E-184006); centre: fragment of New Year's [Christmas] Tree (E-E-184004) New Year's [Christmas] Tree was exhibited at the ASSA gallery, in 1984. See below.   E-E-184004 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov „ART E. Козлов /Е-Е / N. 41 „Новогодная Ель“ / ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ N.41 “New Year's [Christmas] Tree" Photo collage on cardboard or fibreboard, approx. 65 x 95 cm, 1984 This work was exhibited at the ASSA gallery in 1984. more >>    Uploaded 31 March, 2018

Collages by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov displayed at the Erik Goroshevsky Theatre, a semi-private venue, in 1985 more >>. See footnote 6.

Bottom:
„ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“
ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 ‘Good Evening Gustav’
Polyptych, 20 parts, each approx. 29.7 x 21 cm, photo collage, 1984

E-E archival number: E-E-184003
E-E archival number of the picture: E-E-pho-BD21



(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Good Evening Gustav. Part 6 of 20, Ivetta Pomerantseva and Georgy Guryanov. 1984.  E-E archival number: E-E-184003-06 The Timur Novikov Family Collection, Saint Petersburg (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Good Evening Gustav. Part 5 of 20, Ivetta Pomerantseva and Georgy Guryanov. 1984.  E-E archival number: E-E-184003-05 The Timur Novikov Family Collection, Saint Petersburg

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Good Evening Gustav. Part 6 of 20, Ivetta Pomerantseva and Georgy Guryanov. 1984.

E-E archival number: E-E-184003-06
The Timur Novikov Family Collection, Saint Petersburg


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Good Evening Gustav. Part 5 of 20, Ivetta Pomerantseva and Georgy Guryanov. 1984.

E-E archival number: E-E-184003-05
The Timur Novikov Family Collection, Saint Petersburg

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Good Evening Gustav. Part 1 of 20,  Georgy Guryanov and Ivetta Pomerantseva. 1984.  E-E archival number: E-E-184003-01 The Timur Novikov Family Collection, Saint Petersburg (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Unitled Mixed media on paper, 64 x 44 cm, 2000  The composition is an interpretation of pictures 5 and 6 from the “Good Evening Gustav” polyptych.   E-E archival number: E-E-200079

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Good Evening Gustav. Part 1 of 20, Georgy Guryanov and Ivetta Pomerantseva. 1984.

E-E archival number: E-E-184003-01
The Timur Novikov Family Collection, Saint Petersburg

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Unitled
Mixed media on paper, 64 x 44 cm, 2000 more >>

The composition is an interpretation of pictures 5 and 6 from the “Good Evening Gustav” polyptych.

E-E archival number: E-E-200079



The second example of censorship is from the “Happy New Year” exhibition at the Leningrad Rock Club in December 1985. The works that didn’t make it, a painting and several painted photos, are from Kozlov’s graffiti art period he called B(L)ack art (see 2. Let’s Talk About Art. New Wave, New Artists, and B(L)ack art). As in the case of the “Good Evening Gustav” zigzag-fold, they fulfil none of the “classical” conditions for censorship: religion, anti-Soviet propaganda or pornography.[7] In all likelihood, they didn’t meet the censors’ taste – “too ‘new wave’, too unusual”, as Kozlov wrote his friend (Letter I, spring 1986) – but the censors also disapproved of the English script on the painting.[8] 

 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Title of painting unknown, possibly "Я-Я / Ya-Ya" (see bottom right) Letter I to Catherine Mannick, spring 1986, painted vintage print (B) Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University E-E archival number (photo): E-E-pho-EP11-opc E-E archival number of painting: E-E-185008.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Title of painting unknown, possibly "Я-Я / Ya-Ya" (see bottom right)

Letter I to Catherine Mannick, spring 1986, painted vintage print (B) See Letter I, 1986

E-E archival number (photo): E-E-pho-EP11-opc
E-E archival number of painting: E-E-185008.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University



There is also a regretful example of self-censorship – Kozlov’s painting CCCP-USA from 1986. Fearing a possible interpretation of a same-sex relationship between the two powers, the artist burnt it on the shore of the Gulf of Finland (see Letter K, August 1986).

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov with his painting CCCP-USA / USSR-USA Oil on canvas, approx. 160 x 110 cm, 1986, E-E-186026 Photo: C. Mannick, October 1986 Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov with his painting
CCCP-USA / USSR-USA
Oil on canvas, approx. 160 x 110 cm, 1986, E-E-186026
Photo: C. Mannick, October 1986

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University
See Letter L, 1986 and 2. Let’s Talk About Art. New Wave, New Artists, and B(L)ack art).



It is clear that censorship didn’t vanish overnight: In May 1986, a TEII exhibit wasn’t opened officially because artists refused to take down a number of works. In this case, however, censorship did not apply to Kozlov’s work or works.[9]  But in the following years, Leningrad’s Municipal Exhibition Committee seems to have become more lenient, or perhaps simply lost control over the increasing number of public exhibitions. What can be said for sure is that there was no longer any censorship in April 1988, when the first exhibition that presented the New Artists with the group’s name was opened at Leningrad’s Sverdlov House of Culture more >>. Although only eight names appeared on the poster, the exhibition itself saw the works of at least sixteen artists, since, in Timur Novikov words, “The exhibition was organised in the following way: everybody brought along what they saw fit, and no one selected anything from anyone else.” (see Timur Novikov’s exhibition flyer)

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov at his studio “The Russian Field”, Leningrad, with his painting “The Big Le-yenin”, oil on canvas, 3x2m, 1990, see Letter R, March 1990 Photo: Catherine Mannick, May 1990  Digitised slide image: Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov at his studio “The Russian Field”, Leningrad, with his painting “The Big Le-yenin”, oil on canvas, 3x2m, 1990, see Letter R, March 1990
Photo: Catherine Mannick, May 1990

Digitised slide image: Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University



In 1990, Kozlov painted “The Big Le-yenin” – Lenin with red eyes, a typical case for censorship on ideological grounds – and presented it twice publicly, at the Mayak House of Culture (see Letter R, March 1990) and at the Union of Artists Exhibition Hall External link to Youtube. At this stage, censorship seems to have been abandoned altogether.

Hannelore Fobo, 14 April 2024



[1] Among his workplaces were Peterhof Grand Palace, a supermarket, a hospital, and some other, mostly local places. See Hannelore Fobo. The New Artists. Timur Noikov: Roots – E-E Kozlov: Cosmos. Chapter 11. The Petrodvorets Canteen Combine more >>

[2] Тhe municipal exhibition committee (городская выставочная комиссия, gorodskaia vystavochnaia komissiia, shortened ‘gorodskoi vystavkom’) was a division of Leningrad's Main Department of Culture – Главное Управление Культуры Ленгорисполкома, Glavnoe upravlenie kultury Lengorispolkoma.

[3] See footnote 8.

The issue of censorship might have come to the front with a personal show, but for an “unofficial” artist, this was rather difficult to achieve, although not entirely impossible. It demanded, in the first place, a talent for networking and persuasive communication – not exactly Kozlov’s strong points.

[4] Hannelore Fobo. (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov's Participation in the Second TEII Exhibition (1983) in His Diary and Photographs, 2021. Chapter 4: Works on paper: The Peterhof Book of Hours (1982) more >>

[5] От Ленинграда к Санкт-Петербургу
ТЭИИ – Товариществo экспериментального изобразительного искусства –
«Неофициальное» искусство 1981 – 1991 годов / Сост. С. Ковальский, Е. Орлов, Ю. Рыбаков. Музей нонконформистского искусства, Санкт-Петербург, 2007, стр. 611
From Leningrad to Saint-Petersburg. TEII – The Society for Experimental Visual Art. ‘Non-Official’ Art 1981-1991 / Edited by S. Kovalsky, E. Orlov, Yu. Rybakov. The Museum of Nonconformist Art, Saint-Petersburg, 2007, p. 611

[6] Around the same time, in the winter of 1985, Kozlov showed this work in a New Artists exhibition of collages at the Erik Goroshevsky Theatre, the theatre section of the literary "Club 81“, and somewhat later, it appeared at an unidentified public exhibit. Like Timur Novikov’s Assa Gallery (see Letter N, part 2), the Erik Goroshevsky Theatre was one of those private and semi-private – uncensored – venues. (see 2. Let’s Talk About Art. New Wave, New Artists, and B(L)ack art). The extent to which these venues were subject to KGB control is a question that has never been answered to anyone’s satisfaction.

[7] According to artist and curator Sergey Kovalsky, co-founder of the TEII, the task of the Leningrad City Exhibition Committee was to censor images and titles considered to be religious or anti-Soviet propaganda and pornographic works of art. (Kovalsky et al., TEII, p. 249).

Besides, if the criteria for what was banned were more or less clear, their application was not always transparent. The Exhibition Committee required a complete list of all exhibits which it checked with the works displayed before the opening. This often entailed lengthy discussions with the organisers and negotiating “dubious” exhibits.

[8]  Titles were also likely to attract the censor’s unwanted attention. The full title of the polyptich is ART E. Козлов /Е-Е/ N. 40 „ГУД ИВНИН ГУСТАВ“, that is, ART E. Kozlov /E-E/ No. 40 “Good Evening Gustav’”. For the TEII exhibition, Kozlov did away with the English-sounding title, calling it instead  Посвящение Густаву / A dedication to Gustav. It didn’t help. However, like most other artists whose works were (partially) banned, Kozlov was given the right to suggest another work in its place:  Кроме этого, предложено СНЯТЬ работы следующих авторов (с правом замены)… / In addition, it is proposed to REMOVE the works of the following authors (with the right to replace them)… (Kovalsky et al., TEII, p. 611).

[9] See: Весенная выставка произведений изобразительного искусства. / The Spring Exhibition of Works of Visual Arts. / 8-я общая выставка ТЭИИ / The Eighth Exhibition of the Society for Experimental Visual Art (TEII), The Palace of The Youth, Leningrad • 15. 5.-19. 5. 1986 more >>




USA-CCCP. Points of Contact.
Part 1: Introduction
Synopsis • Preliminary Remarks
1. Introduction: From Leningrad to Boston and Back
2. Let’s Talk About Art. New Wave, New Artists, and B(L)ack art.
3. Perestroika Emissaries
4. The End of Censorship
5. “It Seems I Need a Manager.” The Impact of Getting Popular
6. Leningrad Artists and Musicians in E-E Kozlov's Pictures
— The River of Forgetfulness, 1988 —
Part 2: Letters
Letter A (1979) – Halloween
Letter B (1980) – To Be at Peace with Yourself
Letter C (1980) – Harlequin
Pictures 1981 – Flat Exhibitions / Letopis ("Chronicle”)
Letter D (1982) – The Sea and the Countryside
Letter E (1983) – Saigon
Letter F (1983) – Moscow
Letter G (1984) – New Wave
Letter H (1985) – New Composers
Letter I (1986) – Happy New Year at the Leningrad Rock Club
Letter J (1986) – CCCP-USA
Letter K (1986) – The Price of Art
Letter L (1986) – B (L)ack art • PoPs from the USSSR
Letter M (1986) – A Taste for Colours
Letter N (1987) – Part 1: Changes and Challenges
Letter N (1987) – Part 2: ASSA
Letter O (1988) – Joanna Stingray's Wedding
Letter P (1989) – Perestroika Hot News
Letter Q (1989) – Russkoee Polee • The Russian Field
Letter R (1990) – New Classicals
Epilogue: USA-CCCP. Points of Contact (Forthcoming)

see also
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, Catherine Mannick, and Hannelore Fobo papers, 1979-2022 (inclusive)
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection Harvard University >>

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Published 7 June 2024

Last updated 9 July 2024