(E-E) Ev.g.e.n.i.j ..K.o.z.l.o.     Berlin                                                  


      (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov: Leningrad 80s • No.115 >>

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection • Harvard University

USA-CCCP. Points of Contact.
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov – Catherine Mannick
Correspondence 1979 – 1990

Letter O (Beginning of 1988) – Joanna Stingray’s Wedding

A double card with a collage and three text pages constitutes the beginning of Letter O; the other pages have not been preserved. The pages are not dated, but is easy to infer an approximate date, since Letter O is quite obviously an answer to Catherine Mannick’s Letter 41 from 26 December 1987, which Kozlov probably received by the end of January 1988. Mannick had asked him about Joanna Stingray’s wedding “to a musician of KINO”, and he tells her about Stingray’s and Kasparyan’s wedding dinner (November 1987) and also sends her a colourful description of an artists’ New Year party he attended.[1] Likewise, he thanks his friend for her New Year wishes and mentions that he managed to send his New Year greetings and a drawing with an American friend.[2]   Therefore, Letter O must have been written at the beginning of 1988, perhaps in February.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter O to Catherine Mannick, double card, inside (left) and outside (right) with collage, beginning of 1988  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter O to Catherine Mannick, double card, inside (left) and outside (right) with collage, beginning of 1988  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter O to Catherine Mannick, double card, inside (left) and outside (right) with collage, beginning of 1988

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University



The collage, signed E. Kozlov, is a surrealistic portrait of a young man with an asymmetrical moustache and a bright smile. Regarding technique and style, it stands out among Kozlov’s collages, especially among those sent in his previous letters, as is not based on one of the artist’s photographs. Instead, Kozlov cut the facial features into a marbled piece of paper of light blue and yellowish shades he then placed onto a matt black background.

The sharp, swift cutting lines reveal his artistic skill: like little fish swimming in the water, flat elongated structures are floating around the left eye, while the right eye is surrounded by a wreath of ornamental, sharp-edged “petals”. The stark contrast between the shimmering skin and the blackness of the facial expression is further enhanced by silvery shapes applied to the top layer. Presumably made of aluminium powder, they create facial shadows and highlight some other areas,  giving the portrait a “snowy” appeal. Possibly intended to be a self-portrait, the image bears little resemblance to its author, except for its delicate, slightly grotesque humour.

In his letter, Kozlov continues paying attention to what is somewhat outside the norm or strange, but all the same amiable and amusing, for instance when he tells Mannick about how their common friend Andrey prepared a chicken for Christmas – “very peppered, quite in his style (when he’s drinking wine)” (p.1). Put differently, he not only keeps his friend updated on what is happening on his side of the world, but entertains her with some intriguing details to make sure she’s coming back to her “beloved Leningrad and Petrodvorets which are waiting for you with impatience and miss you very much!".

In a recent remark on his correspondence with Catherine Mannick, Evgenij Kozlov said that his encounters with his friend created in him a positive feeling of alienation towards what surrounded him in everyday life. Because he perceived those exceptional moments as natural, the habitual became insignificant. On the other hand, looking for the exceptional also means experiencing the fantastic as augmented reality.[3] This approach becomes obvious with Kozlov’s account of how he spent the New Year.

    Well, then there was the New Year. I celebrated it among Peterhof artists and art lovers. The city authorities gave us an old small two-story house for an art salon, where we arranged a beautifully set table, a New Year’s [Christmas] tree, a fireplace, candles, and a piano. People sang Russian folk songs and opera arias (almost like in the Kirov Theatre), a mini concert of sorts prepared especially for this holiday. At 4 o'clock [in the morning], friends began to arrive who had celebrated the New Year at home and, if there weren’t enough seats at the table, they sat down in a second and third row – and turned the place into something like a concert hall. It was a surreal night with firecrackers exploding, sparklers and candles burning, music and songs sounding; some were walking around, others dancing, and if it hadn’t been for the modern clothes, everything would have been like in the XIX century. What's happening to me? Maybe it's just the weight of my years? Or was there a rest from the work of the outgoing year, when I could relax and not think about what I would do tomorrow? I guess I was just flying in my fantasies! (p.2)

What Kozlov called “the work of the outgoing year” relates, in all likelihood, to his artistic activity, since he no longer worked in what he called “a government job” (see Letter K). It would therefore be wrong to assume that he complained about work; quite the contrary, work was essential to him.[4] Yet he much welcomed a break from his solitary occupation – a break in time spent in the company of friends, and this “unlimited temporal dimension”[5] had the aesthetic quality of a fantastic feast, reminiscent of the Spring Ball in Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita, although perhaps lacking some of its extravagancy and mysticism. Kozlov comments on his impressions:

    It seems that these feelings are just a part of the Russian soul, its light, when some warm waves suddenly roll in and you are completely immersed in them, and you drown, and you don't want a new day to come tomorrow again. (p.3)

The spirit of fantastic magic was also present in the wedding of Joanna Stingray and Yuri Kasparyan, the guitarist of the band KINO, related in the last paragraph of the fragment from Letter O. Stingray writes about it in “Red Wave”, her autobiography of her Russian years lasting from 1984 to 1996.[6]

Joanna Stingray & Madison Stingray. Red Wave: an American in the Soviet Music Underground, Los Angeles, CA; DoppelHouse Press, 2020

Joanna Stingray & Madison Stingray. Red Wave: an American in the Soviet Music Underground, Los Angeles, CA; DoppelHouse Press, 2020

Joanna Stingray & Madison Stingray. Red Wave: an American in the Soviet Music Underground, Los Angeles, CA; DoppelHouse Press, 2020 Inside front cover with Joanna Stingray's dedication  Left: МИР И РОК Н РОЛЛ! [peace and rock n'roll] Stingray Right: For Evgeny and Hannelore, Peace & rock n'roll. УРА [Hurray] Stingray

Joanna Stingray & Madison Stingray. Red Wave: an American in the Soviet Music Underground, Los Angeles, CA; DoppelHouse Press, 2020
Inside front cover with Joanna Stingray's dedication
Left: МИР И РОК Н РОЛЛ! [peace and rock n'roll] Stingray
Right: For Evgeny and Hannelore, Peace & rock n'roll. УРА [Hurray] Stingray




The sheer fact that the wedding finally happened was almost a miracle. Originally planned for 6 April, 1987, it had to be postponed indefinitely: after Stingray’s 1986 U.S. release of the Red Wave album of Leningrad bands, Soviet authorities blocked her from entering the country, although not immediately (see Letter N Part 1). But after January 1987, a campaign against Stingray was started in the Ogonyok magazine and the Komsomolskaya Pravda,[7] obviously launched by some high-ranking people working against Gorbachov’s perestroika. Stingray was still quite confident that the numerous contacts she had established with Soviet officials from the cultural field would protect her, but this wasn’t so. As it turned out, her name was on a blacklist, of which she learned only when she was denied her tourist visa to fly to Leningrad for her wedding. She immediately started moving heaven and earth to lift the ban on her, but without much success.[8] The question was finally decided in her favour at the highest level. Joanna Stingray writes that in late summer 1987, U.S. Secretary of State George Shultz and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard Shevardnadze discussed an upcoming meeting between President Reagan and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachov. “Thanks to the relentless persistence from Senator Alan Cranston, Secretary Shultz brought up my blocked visa.”[9] 

The bridal couple Joanna Stingray and Yuri Kasparyan with wedding presents and guests From left to right: Paquita Escofet Miro, Georgy Guryanov, (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, Andrey Krisanov and Valery Alakhov. Leningrad, 2 November 1987, Austeria restaurant. Courtesy © Joanna Stingray

The bridal couple Joanna Stingray and Yuri Kasparyan with wedding presents and guests
From left to right: Paquita Escofet Miro, Georgy Guryanov, (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, Andrey Krisanov and Valery Alakhov.
Leningrad, 2 November 1987, Austeria restaurant.
Courtesy © Joanna Stingray



The wedding eventually took place on 2 November 1987, orchestrated like an opulent theatre production, with a rock concert the previous day and a follow-up party in Moscow. Pictures from Stingray’s archive show a beautiful bride wearing a stylish white wedding dress[10] and a handsome bridegroom dressed in black tie tails. Stingray recaps, “Decades later, Russian media wrote that this ‘rock-wedding’ was the most pivotal, beautiful wedding of the ’80s, the day when the Cold War finally seemed to end.”[11]


Valery Alakhov's guest pass to the wedding of Joanna Stingray and Yuri Kasparyan dated April 6, 1987
The Sergey Chubraev Collection

Invitation to the wedding of Joanna Stingray and Yuri Kasparyan Double card, outside.  The Sergey Chubraev Collection

Invitation to the wedding of Joanna Stingray and Yuri Kasparyan
Double card, outside.

The Sergey Chubraev Collection

Invitation to the wedding of Joanna Stingray and Yuri Kasparyan Double card, inside, with handwritten correction of the original date, 6 April 1987, to 2 November 1987  The Sergey Chubraev Collection

Invitation to the wedding of Joanna Stingray and Yuri Kasparyan
Double card, inside, with handwritten correction of the original date, 6 April 1987, to 2 November 1987

The Sergey Chubraev Collection



Guests received a pass granting them “Access All Areas”. For the invitation card to the wedding dinner, printed in curly Cyrillic lettering many months earlier with the April date, the bridal couple found a pragmatic solution: the old date was crossed out, and above it, the new date was inserted by hand.

E-E Kozlov attended the wedding dinner, described by Joanna Stingray as “the most beautiful, joyous mess”.[12] In his letter, he writes

    You are asking if I was at Joanna Stingray's wedding with Yuri? Yes, it was an interesting event. The wedding took place in the restaurant "Austeria", located in the Peter and Paul Fortress, which they rented specifically for his event. There was the whole world representing "unofficial" art; the consular corps; artists came specially from England and France, and, probably, from other countries. There were a lot of people and it was simply impossible to talk to everyone — about 200 people. Joanna brought her manager and cameraman (he shot a special film about her, about the culture of Leningrad, artists, musicians, about the wedding and, in general, about her stay in the USSR). Artists gave them their paintings and drawings. (p.3)

Joanna Stingray with two paintings she recieved as wedding gifts. On the wall: America (1987) by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Right: British artist Andrew Logan Courtesy Joanna Stingray, 1987

Joanna Stingray with two paintings she recieved as wedding gifts. On the wall:
America (1987) by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Right: British artist Andrew Logan
Courtesy Joanna Stingray, 1987



Some of these gifts can be seen in Stingray’s pictures from the wedding dinner, including Kozlov’s present, a large work on paper from 1987 entitled “АМЕРИКА”, America. In his studio “Galaxy Gallery”, Kozlov displayed it next to his painting “China-CCCP”, thus completing the trinity of antagonistic powers.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Америка / America. Ink on paper, approx 70 x 100 cm, 1987 Reproduction courtesy Joanna Stingray.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Америка / America. Ink on paper, approx 70 x 100 cm, 1987
Reproduction courtesy Joanna Stingray.


(E-E) EVGENIJ KOZLOV with guitar and T-shirt CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCP standing in front of his painting КИТАЙ-СССР / CHINA-CCCP, 161 x 213 cm, 1987
A fragment of “America” can be seen in the upper right corner
Galaxy Gallery, studio of the artist, Peterhof, 1987 See Letter N, part 1 >>



The composition, a large drawing on paper painted with coloured ink, presents seven figures sitting next to each other at a long table, typing on keyboards. Each figure is mirrored by one of the seven letters А М Е Р И К А which thus substitute the respective computer screens. Placing a piece of gauze on top of the paper, Kozlov applied the strokes in a rapid fashion, with a thick spot at the beginning and a finer line petering out. The gauze absorbed some of the ink, and on the paper, this effect gives the brushstrokes a velvet touch more about the technique >>. Diagonal lines converge in a vanishing point placed outside the left border, providing the work with a dynamic perspective.The geometric, sketchy structure of the design turns figures and chairs into pictograms, especially the smaller ones – modern hieroglyphs. The head and shoulders of the figure to the very left actually resembles a reversed Cyrillic letter Я, Ya, which translates as “I”.

The letter continues

    It seems that Joanna is going to arrange an exhibition in America of these gifts and those canvases that she had already taken out of the USSR. Try not to miss this event, because it should be very interesting. (p.3)


Invitation card to Joanna Stingray's “Red Wave” The Stock Exchange, Los Angeles, 7 April 1988 Participating artists (spelling corrected): Novikov, Bugaev, Kotelnikov, Krisanov, Savchenkov, Kozlov, Sotnikov, Guryanov.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

Invitation card to Joanna Stingray's “Red Wave”
The Stock Exchange, Los Angeles, 7 April 1988
Participating artists (spelling corrected): Novikov, Bugaev, Kotelnikov, Krisanov, Savchenkov, Kozlov, Sotnikov, Guryanov.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University



Red Wave. "Unofficial" Contemporary Art and Music from the USSR opened at the Jerry Solomon Gallery, Los Angeles, on 28 January, 1988, as a Greenpeace benefit. By all accounts, the first of three “Red Wave” exhibitions Stingray arranged in Los Angeles had already passed by the time Catherine Mannick received the letter. The exhibition then continued at the Stock Exchange on 7 April 1988 more >>; an invitation card is in the Davis Center collection. Both shows presented works from the collection Stingray had been building up for some time. In “Red Wave”, Stingray writes about her collection, “Over the last four years, while I had been smuggling in equipment and art supplies for all the rockers and artists, they thanked me by giving me pieces of their work.[13] 

The following year, the venue was the Sawtelle Gallery, where Red Wave. New Art from Leningrad lasted from 18 March to 16 April 1989. It was the first time one of the Leningrad artists was able to attend: Sergei Bugaev flew in prior to the opening, bringing along more works. During the opening, Paul Judelson from New York bought a number of pieces and, following that, promoted Leningrad art with two exhibitions in 1989 and 1990, thus starting a business as an art dealer more >>.[14] Of these five exhibitions, Kozlov’s name is present in all invitation cards and lists of exhibits, with the exception of the first one at the Jerry Solomon Gallery. However, Ksenia Novikova’s New Artists Chronicle  includes his name for the this one, too.[15] Given the fact that in those days, printed names and lineups of artists didn’t always coincide, such a possibility exists.

In 1986, Evgenij Kozlov created a group portrait with Joanna Stingray and two of her friends, Sergei Bugaev and Andrey Krisanov,[16] and in 1989, he depicted her in an outstanding semi-realistic portrait, dressing her in a Soviet space suit. Without any doubt, Stingray landed in Leningrad from outer space – and then got hooked, as she put it, on “this crazy, wonderfully terrifying land of unpredictable and unconceivable things”.[17] The Russian titles of her autobiography, which was first edited in 2019 in two volumes, reflect her impressions: “Стингрей в Стране Чудес” / Stingray in Wonderland, and “Стингрей в Зазеркалье” / Stingray Through the Looking-Glass.[18]

In 2016 (Muzeum Sztuki, Lodz) and 2018 (Akademie der Künste, Berlin), Kozlov’s portrait of Stingray was shown at the exhibition Notes from the Underground – Alternative Art and Music in Eastern Europe 1968 – 1994. It was part of the “Leningrad” section dedicated to the 1980s, hanging next to Kozlov’s self-portrait and his portraits of Timur Novikov, Georgy Guryanov, Oleg Kotelnikov, the New Composers, and his pictures with Sergey Kuryokhin from the Insect Culture series. In this way, the exhibition paid homage to a strong-spirited American whose extraordinary input to the Leningrad “unofficial” scene helped bringing out Soviet rock groups from the underground. Being very young and very determined, Stingray engaged in what she called “the dream I had from the beginning of a cultural camaraderie.”[19] 

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov with Портрет Джоанны Стингрей / Portrait of Joanna Stingray Wax crayon and charcoal on paper, 63.2 x 49 cm, 1989 Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 2018

I(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov with
Портрет Джоанны Стингрей / Portrait of Joanna Stingray
Wax crayon and charcoal on paper, 63.2 x 49 cm, 1989
Akademie der Künste, Berlin, 2018 more >>



Hannelore Fobo, 7 October 2023



[1]    Letter 41 also refers to Kozlov’s copyright questions in Letter N from autumn 1987; Mannick answers that the picture is not copyright-protected since it hadn’t been published under his name before.   

[2]    The drawing could not be identified. Judging by Mannick’s Letter 44 from August 1988, she hadn’t been able to connect with this girl, and whether they met at all is not clear.

[3]    Concerning the principle of augmented reality in Kozlov’s art see: Hannelore Fobo. The New Artists. Timur Novikov: Roots – E-E Kozlov: Cosmos. Chapter 10. Fishing at Peter the Great’s pond (2020) http://www.e-e.eu/Timur-Novikov-Roots-E-E-Kozlov-Cosmos/index10.htm

[4]    Some years later, Kozlov would insist that “producing” art is not work (rabota), but creation (tvorchestvo)

[5]    Novikov, Roots, Chapter 13. A perception of pureness http://www.e-e.eu/Timur-Novikov-Roots-E-E-Kozlov-Cosmos/index13.htm

[6]    Co-authored with her daughter Madison Stingray. Joanna Stingray & Madison Stingray. Red Wave: an American in the Soviet Music Underground, Los Angeles, CA; DoppelHouse Press, 2020,

[7]    Ibid., pp. 154/155

[8]    Ibid., pp. 159-182, chapters “Why are they so afraid of love?” and “Help Stingray”.

[9]    Ibid., p. 188

[10]  “On top of it all, a designer and I came up with a futuristic peau de soie white wedding dress that I lovingly dubbed my Jetsons dress.” Ibid., p. 157

[11]  Ibid. p. 209. In 2021, Stingray published a book dedicated to this spectacular story: Русский рок. Конец андерграунда. Фотографии. Интервью. Документы / Russian Rock. The End of Underground. Pictures. Interviews. Documents.

[12]  Ibid., p. 212

[13]  Ibid., p. 226

[14]  Ibid., pp 266/267

[15]  Ksenia Novikova: The New Artists. Chronicle, p. 277, in: The New Artists. Editors: Ekaterina Andreyeva, Nelli Podgorskaya, 304 pages. Texts in Russian and English. Moscow Museum of Modern Art and Maier Publishing, Moscow, 2012

[16]  Д.А.С. / D.A.S [Джоана, Андрей, Сергей / Joanna, Andrey, Sergei]
Mixed media (nitro enamel?) on canvas?, approx. 130 x 110 cm, 1986, E-E-186025. more >>
It is not clear what became of it.

[17]  Red Wave, p. 183

[18]  While the first volume (1984-1987) focuses on Stingray’s Leningrad years, the second volume (1988-1996) highlights her Moscow years, where Stingray settled after her separation from Yury Kasparyan, starting a solo career as a rock-singer. In 2023, a new Russian edition has united both volumes as История русской рок-музыки в эпоху потрясений и перемен / The History of Russian Rock Music in an Era of Upheaval and Change, with a subtitle written in Russian and English, СПАСЕМ МИР SAVE THE WORLD (see Letter N Part 1). Stingray’s vast archive of videos, interviews, photographs and other documents, recently published in a series of books in Russia, is invaluable for anyone who tries to recompose a realistic picture of an unlikely situation – when in the Soviet Union, all of a sudden, everything seemed possible.

[19]  Red Wave, p. 201




 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter O to Catherine Mannick, top page with collage, 1988  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-188084

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter O to Catherine Mannick, top page with collage, 1988

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-188084




 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter O to Catherine Mannick, p. 1, 1988  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter O to Catherine Mannick, p. 1, 1988

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

Page 1

Дорогая моя Катя!

Спасибо за письмо и поздравления с Рождеством и Новым Годом. Не расстраивайся, пожалуйста, что я не поздравил тебя в письме, я думал, что письмо будет идти долго, а за неделю до праздника, у меня возникла прекрасная возможность передать тебе мои поздравления через одну Американскую девушку. Она училась в Ленинграде и на Рождество, вместе с Андреем и Никитой (ее парень) они приехали ко мне на party. Ее зовут Карен А. Смит, я послал через нее для тебя и Марины по одному рисунку, и Карен делала фотографии, которые тоже обещала передать тебе. Очень надеюсь, что ту все это получила !!! Мы пили вино, ели курицу, которую готовил Андрей — очень перченую, совсем в его стиле (когда выпьет вина), разговаривали, смотрели мои рисунки — все было довольно мило и „совсем“ спокойно (увидишь на фотографиях! Карен и Никита прекрасные люди! Она собирается заниматься бизнесом с СССР, думаю, что через 2-3 месяца снова поедет в Ленинград. Я дал твой адрес и Марины тоже. Если у тебя будет возможность, встреться с ней




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter O to Catherine Mannick, p. 2, 1988  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter O to Catherine Mannick, p. 2, 1988

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

Page 2

и поговори о твоем любимом Ленинграде и Петродворце, которые тебе ждут с нетерпением и очень скучают!

Ну а потом был Новый Год. Я праздновал его среди Петергофских художников и любителей искусства. Городские власти дали нам старинный маленький двухэтажный дом под художественный салон, где мы устраивали красивый стол, елку, камин, свечи, пианино. Многие пели Русские народные песни и оперные арии (– почти как в Кировском театре), такой mini концерт, приготовленный специально к этому празднику. В 4 часа стали приехать друзья, кто отмечал Новый Год дома и, если не хватало мест за столом, то рассаживались вторым и третьим рядом — получилось что-то вроде концертного зала.  Сюрреалистическая ночь — взрываются хлопушки, горят Бенгальские огни и свечи, звучит музыка и песни, кто-то ходит, кто-то танцует и, если бы не современная одежда, то все было бы, как в XIX веке. Что происходит со мной? Возможно, это только груз моих лет? Или поступал отдых от труда уходящего года, когда я мог расслабиться и не думать о том, что буду делать завтра? Наверное, я просто летал в своих фантазиях!




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter O to Catherine Mannick, p. 3, 1988  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter O to Catherine Mannick, p. 3, 1988

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

Page 3

Кажется, эти ощущения просто часть Русской души, ее свет, когда какие-то теплые волны неожиданно накатываются и ты полностью погружаешься в них, и тонешь, и не хочешь, чтобы завтра наступал новый день снова.

Ты спрашиваешь, был ли я на свадьбе Joanna Stingray с Юрием? Да, это было интересное событие. Свадьба происходила в ресторане „Аустерия“, который находится в Петропавловской крепости и который они сняли специально для своего события. Был весь свет „неофициального“ искусства, консульский корпус, специально приехали художники из Англии и Франции, и, наверное, и из других стран. Народу было очень много и со всеми, просто, невозможно было говорить — человек 200. Joanna привезла своего менеджера и кинооператора, (он снимал специальный фильм о ней, о культуре Ленинграда, художниках, музыкантах, о свадьбе и, вообще, о ее пребывании в СССР). Художники дарили им свои картины и рисунки. Кажется, Joanna собирается устроить в Америке выставку этих подарков и тех полотен, что раньше уже вывезла из СССР. Постарайся не пропустить это событие, т.к. оно должно быть очень интересным. Возможно, тебе тоже стоит […]




USA-CCCP. Points of Contact.
Part 1: Introduction
Synopsis • Preliminary Remarks
1. From Leningrad to Boston and Back
2. Let’s Talk About Art. New Wave, New Artists, and B(L)ack art
3. Perestroika Emissaries
4. The End of Censorship
5. “It Seems I Need a Manager.” The Impact of Getting Popular
6. Leningrad Artists and Musicians in E-E Kozlov's Pictures
— The River of Forgetfulness, 1988 —
Part 2: Letters
Letter A (1979) – Halloween
Letter B (1980) – To Be at Peace with Yourself
Letter C (1980) – Harlequin
Letter D (1982) – The Sea and the Countryside
Letter E (1983) – Saigon
Letter F (1983) – Moscow
Letter G (1984) – New Wave
Letter H (1985) – New Composers
Letter I (1986) – Happy New Year at the Leningrad Rock Club
Letter J (1986) – CCCP-USA
Letter K (1986) – The Price of Art
Letter L (1986) – B (L)ack art • PoPs from the USSSR
Letter M (1986) – A Taste for Colours
Letter N (1987) – Part 1: Changes and Challenges
Letter N (1987) – Part 2: ASSA
Letter O (1988) – Joanna Stingray's Wedding
Letter P (1989) – Perestroika Hot News
Letter Q (1989) – Russkoee Polee • The Russian Field
Letter R (1990) – New Classicals
Epilogue: USA-CCCP. Points of Contact (Forthcoming)

see also
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, Catherine Mannick, and Hannelore Fobo papers, 1979-2022 (inclusive)
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection Harvard University>>

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Published 18 October 2023
Last updated 13 June 2024