(E-E) Ev.g.e.n.i.j ..K.o.z.l.o.     Berlin                                                  


      (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov: Leningrad 80s • No.113 >>

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection • Harvard University

USA-CCCP. Points of Contact.
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov – Catherine Mannick
Correspondence 1979 – 1990

Text and Research: Hannelore Fobo, 2021/2024



Letter L (October 1986) – B(L)ack art • PoPs from the USSSR

Letter L begins with Evgenij Kozlov’s birthday greetings. As always, they recall Halloween:

    I congratulate you on your birthday!
    I made this funny photo series especially for your celebration! Do you like it? I wanted you to remember me and Leningrad vividly again — those impressions, entertainments, meetings, the spiritual atmosphere that I created for you here. The other people in the pictures that you don't know are our Halloween (and everything else, too, what do you think?) (P. 1)
    I'm sorry that we don't have an official Halloween day on some day of the year, but I just thought that in the Soviet Union, Halloween happens every day! But how did you celebrate your birthday, how was London, Cambridge, how have you acclimatised at home? (P. 2)

The date of the letter is not visible in the picture, but because of the birthday greetings and the reference to Halloween, it must have been written towards the end of October 1986, not long after Catherine Mannick’s Leningrad visit earlier the same month. On 1 October, Kozlov received her letter announcing her visit from 9-12 October (Letter 35). Because her letters might be read by censors, Mannick didn’t pass this kind of information early on, but Kozlov had already known of her plans to travel to the USSR by a common friend (Letter K) and was looking forward to seeing her again. On 3 October, she sent him a short letter from Moscow, telling him that she was going to stay at the Astoria hotel and suggesting a meeting for 9 October at 4.00 p.m. at Dom knigi, where she would be waiting for half an hour. Dom knigi.

Дом книги / Dom knigi / House of Books (Singer Company House) on Nevsky Prospekt Photo by Alex 'Florstein' Fedorov, 2014, CC BY-SA Wikimedia Commons

Дом книги / Dom knigi / House of Books (Singer Company House) on Nevsky Prospekt
Photo by Alex 'Florstein' Fedorov, 2014, CC BY-SA Wikimedia Commons External link >>



The House of Books, was – and still is – a famous bookstore on Nevsky prospekt, located in the splendid Singer building, the former headquarters of the Singer Company. The letter arrived on 8 October, but Mannick’s telegram from 5 October had made the information obsolete.




It was one those rare opportunities Mannick and Kozlov had to meet personally. They had last seen each other in October 1984, and in Letter L, Kozlov stresses the importance of her visit. Mannick’s slides and Kozlov’s black and white (painted) photographs show that he prepared a rich programme for his American friend, introducing her to the Leningrad art and music scene. They visited the flats and studios of New Composer Valery Alakhov and of Evgeny Yufit, a well-known painter, photographer, experimental filmmaker and founder of the Leningrad "Nekrorealists".

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Yevgeny Yufit in his studio, Leningrad, October 1986  The scan of the film negative shows the pattern of the drawings mirrored, as Kozlov scratched them into the film emulsion spread on the reverse of the film strip. Heat is coming out from the teapot, while “CCCP“ designates Yufit.  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BX14 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Yevgeny Yufit  Kozlov printed the negative mirror-inverted to correct the display of the letters CCCP  Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986. Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 6  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BX14-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Yevgeny Yufit in his studio, Leningrad, October 1986

The scan of the film negative shows the pattern of the drawings mirrored, as Kozlov scratched them into the film emulsion spread on the reverse of the film strip. Heat is coming out from the teapot, while “CCCP“ designates Yufit.

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BX14
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Yevgeny Yufit

Kozlov printed the negative mirror-inverted to correct the display of the letters CCCP

Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 6

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BX14-opc



(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Catherine Mannick, Evgenij Kozlov, Georgy Gurianov. Leningrad restaurant. From the album ”Это модно • It's the fashion! 1984-1990”14.5 x 20.5 cm, 1986-7 more>>  The same negative was used for Letter L, page 4, with a different design (see below)  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y017-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Catherine Mannick, Evgenij Kozlov, Georgy Gurianov. Leningrad restaurant.
Painted vintage print, 14.5 x 20.5 cm, 1986-7
From the album ”“Это модно • It's the fashion! 1984-1990”
more >>
The same negative was used for Letter L, page 4, with a different design (see below)

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y017-opc



Igor Verichev's paintings at Valery Alakhov's place, Leningrad, October 1986  David Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  Photo: Catherine Mannick

Igor Verichev's paintings at Valery Alakhov's place, Leningrad, October 1986

Photo: Catherine Mannick

Digitised slide image: David Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University



Together with Valery Alakhov and Georgy Guryanov, drummer of the legendary KINO band, they spent an evening at a restaurant. At Kozlov’s own flat and studio “Galaxy Gallery”, Mannick documented the painting “USA-CCCP” (also “CCCP-USA”; see Letters J and K) and a double page of his album of collages “SEXPOPS”, of which today only some fragments have remained. This picture also shows a part of Dore Ashton’s illustrated book “American Art Since 1945” from 1982, possibly Mannick’s gift to her friend.[2]

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Double page from the book of collages SEXPOPS. Kozlov used the top fragment of the right page for his work “Охотники за черепами / Headhunters” from 1988. See E-E-188020 more>>  A fragment of the book is now in the Timur Novikov Family Collection and was exhibited in 2012 at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMOMA) on the occasion of the New Artists exhibition НОВЫЕ ИДУТ! THE NEW ARE HERE! more>>. The rest of the book, including this double page, has been lost.  Photo: Catherine Mannick, October 1986

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Double page from the book of collages SEXPOPS. Kozlov used the top fragment of the right page for his work “Охотники за черепами / Headhunters” from 1988. See E-E-188020 more >>
A fragment of the book is now in the Timur Novikov Family Collection and was exhibited in 2012 at the Moscow Museum of Modern Art (MMOMA) on the occasion of the New Artists exhibition НОВЫЕ ИДУТ! THE NEW ARE HERE! more >>. The rest of the book, including this double page, has been lost.

Left: a fragment of Dore Ashton’s illustrated book “American Art Since 1945” from 1982, possibly Mannick’s gift to her friend.

Photo: Catherine Mannick, October 1986

Digitised slide image: David Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Catherine Mannick looking at Kozlov's book of collages SEXPOPS. Galaxy Gallery, Kozlov's studio and flat at Petrodvorets (Peterhof), October 1986 Vintage print, 14 x 8.9 cm, 1986  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-YG16-op-f (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Catherine Mannick with Kozlov's book of collages SEXPOPS. Galaxy Gallery, Kozlov's studio and flat at Petrodvorets (Peterhof), October 1986 Vintage print, 14 x 8.9 cm, 1986  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-YG17-op-f

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Catherine Mannick looking at Kozlov's book of collages SEXPOPS. Galaxy Gallery, Kozlov's studio and flat at Petrodvorets (Peterhof), October 1986
Vintage print, 14 x 8.9 cm, 1986

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-YG16-op-f
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Catherine Mannick with Kozlov's book of collages SEXPOPS. Galaxy Gallery, Kozlov's studio and flat at Petrodvorets (Peterhof), October 1986
Vintage print, 14 x 8.9 cm, 1986

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-YG17-op-f



Kozlov concludes his impressions:

    I still can't open myself up to everyday life here, after our meetings. Of course, I communicate with friends and other people, walk the streets, go to the movies, concerts, I paint (as you can see) — I live, but all this happens on another level, as if in another world, another country — it can't even be called alienation from the environment or the rejection of it. What happens is that my world, my condition, my peace and anxiety, the harmony of my life have changed. It was very important and necessary for me to see you and talk to you, and I am deeply grateful to you from the bottom of my heart for your visit. (Pp. 2/3)

If the visit catapulted Kozlov outside his habitual situation, it also left a strong impact on his friend. Some of Mannick’s impressions can be read on the reverse of her photo of Evgeny Yufit. It is a picture Kozlov possibly received as an attachment to her answer to Letter L.

    … the farewell evening was a real high [polnyi kaif] – I will never forget, when I hear that Beatles song[3] that they played at the party where we were, I am immediately there – on another, wonderful planet. And I am glad that it was also pleasant and unusual for you. Such good feelings remain – it’s true there was little time, but it was very good with you – sitting at your place in Peterhof, strolling, in the restaurant, at the concert, at parties, on crazy taxis, listening to Vysotsky’s music, one can dream of this! Katya
Evgeny Yufit in his studio Leningrad, October 1986  Photo: Catherine Mannick On the reverse of the picture: Catherine Mannick's Russian text from her letter to E-E Kozlov . English translation: see above

Evgeny Yufit in his studio
Leningrad, October 1986

Photo: Catherine Mannick
On the reverse of the picture: Catherine Mannick's Russian text from her letter to E-E Kozlov .
English translation: see above



The concert Mannick mentioned was one of the UB40 concerts at the Yubileinyi bowl, which was part of UB40’s Soviet tour – according to Rolling Stone, “one of the first big tours of the country by a major band from the West”.[4]

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  UB40 concert at the Yubileinyi bowl, Leningrad, October 1986 Young man with УБ40 СССР T-shirt  E-E- archival number: E-E-AP14 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  UB40 concert at the Yubileinyi bowl, Leningrad, October 1986  E-E- archival number: E-E-AP13

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

UB40 concert at the Yubileinyi bowl, Leningrad, October 1986
Young man with УБ40 СССР T-shirt

E-E- archival number: E-E-AP14

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

UB40 concert at the Yubileinyi bowl, Leningrad, October 1986

E-E- archival number: E-E-AP13

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  UB40 fans at the Yubileinyi bowl, Leningrad, October 1986  E-E- archival number: E-E-AP21 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  New Composers Igor Verichev (centre) and Valery Alakhov (right) with a friend at the Yubileinyi bowl, Leningrad, October 1986, after the UB40 concert.  E-E- archival number: E-E-AP22

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

UB40 fans at the Yubileinyi bowl, Leningrad, October 1986

E-E- archival number: E-E-AP21

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

New Composers Igor Verichev (centre) and Valery Alakhov (right) with a friend at the Yubileinyi bowl, Leningrad, October 1986, after the UB40 concert.

E-E- archival number: E-E-AP22



She recalls the concert:

    The UB40 concert was a major event in Leningrad, and I remember that Evgenij was very excited about going (in fact, I think he had been at an earlier concert; the band performed several times in Leningrad). I was less interested - why would I want to go to a concert by a western band while I was in Leningrad? However, I am very glad I did; it was a key perestroika event. My main memory of the concert is a бунт (“bunt”, revolt) by the audience. At one point, the band called out to the audience to dance; the MC translated this as "move in place" ("Двигайтесь на месте"), or something along those lines. However, the audience had understood the band very well and began dancing in the aisles - and no one did anything!  The security forces, who were there, of course, just stood by. Cracks were beginning to appear in the system. At the concert, I met a number of Evgenij’s friends from the Leningrad music scene – Valery Alakhov from the New Composers, Georgy Guryanov (“Gustav”) from Kino, Sergei Kuriokhin from Pop Mekhanika (I saw him again when he performed in Boston in the late 1980s), and the American rocker, Joanna Stingray.

The “real high” of Mannick’s visit stood in contrast to the conditions restricting Kozlov’s creative work. He already mentioned them in his previous letter, but now contrasts the constraints limiting his self-realisation with the opportunities enjoyed by his friend.

    We are really capable of helping each other, especially, if you feel it, when we meet. And I like my changes, my harmony with myself now. But what to do with creativity, I do not know. I lack a field of activity, of creating on a large scale – there is nowhere to unfold exactly what I have already talked about with you, or rather I did not have time to talk, I just complained a little. I, Katya, am suffocating. Do you know this depressing state? You have the opportunity to pour your energy into work, but I don't. I dream of a time and a place where I can paint ten-metre canvases, where I have paints, lots of paints, in huge jars – they drive me crazy.[5] I can, I want, I have to express myself! Only this activity will reveal me truly, otherwise it’s the end, all in vain, the whole life is a dream and a fog. (pp. 5-7)

Although Kozlov had every reason to complain about his situation, he suddenly felt that this was taking him nowhere and turned to irony. Over-exaggerating his lament (“horror, nightmare”) he introduces the term “ASSA”, the New Artists’ playful slogan commenting on an outstanding yet unlikely occurrence (see also Letter I >> and Letter N Part 2 >>). The passage ends with a rather laconic remark.

    And no relief from the words, they just heat up everything even more — horror, nightmare — ASSA. I can't write about it anymore. I'll be more specific next time. (p.7)

Kozlov wrote the text of Letter L with pencil on the reverse of eight vintage prints, each in a 10 x 15 cm format, painted in the bright, sophisticated graffiti-comic art style he started developing in 1985. These small formats provide an idea of how such works would have looked like on a ten-metre canvas.[6]

Five of the works refer to Mannick’s 1986 visit; one of them carries the ACCA (ASSA) script. The other three pictures are from a Pop Mekhanika performance on 20 October 1986 at the Leningrad Palace of Youth. It was called “The Goat Concert or Introduction to Pop Mechanics” (Козлиный концерт или Введение в Поп-механику) more >>. The Pop Mekhanika pictures features, among others, Natalia Pivovarova, leader of the “Kolibri” band. Two of the eight pictures also exist in different painted versions in Kozlov's album "It’s the Fashion" (1984-1990), where they appear as collages on coloured cardboard more >>.[7] It actually seems that all pictures from Letter L had originally been fixed to cardboard sheets, because the corners of the text pages show marks of adhesive. In this case, it is likely that Kozlov detached them from their respective “frames” in order to send them off in a small envelope.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Valery Alakhov, Catherine Mannick, Georgy Gurianov. Leningrad, October 1986  Painted vintage print,14.4 x 20.2 cm, 1986-7 From the album “Это модно • It's the fashion! 1984-1990” more>>  The same negative was used for Letter L, page 5, with a different design (see below)  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y018-opc1

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Valery Alakhov, Catherine Mannick, Georgy Gurianov. Leningrad, October 1986
Painted vintage print,14.4 x 20.2 cm, 1986-7
From the album “Это модно • It's the fashion! 1984-1990” more >>

The same negative was used for Letter L, page 5, with a different design (see below)

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y018-opc1



B(L)ack art

Shades of blue, grey and black dominate the picture from page 1, giving it a metallic look. It shows Catherine Mannick in profile, standing on a sidewalk. Her urban outfit has been covered with a rural costume and her beret turned into a spiky cap. The angular, compact forms of coat, skirt and boots, outlined with the help of contrasting contours, stand in plain contrast to an effervescing shape coming down from her head like a contrail of white steam – perhaps an uncontrolled growth of hair or a huge bridal veil. The funny sharp-edged points of Mannick’s boots are directed upwards, and she seems to be touching the earth only with her heels. Thus, the boots and the “steam” imply up-and-down movements, while the figure itself is static. As a result, Mannick appears to be walking and standing simultaneously. Kozlov adds: “Look at those psychedelic wiggling figures with their smiling faces breaking through the sidewalk, which isn’t a sidewalk at all. It all happens in some futuristic, surreal cosmic space, some kind of chaos orchestrated by the peasant lady.” The composition exemplifies Kozlov’s creation of polarities and paradoxes by adding strange, often humorous elements. This is why the image is spirited, vital, and animated.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Catherine Mannick Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986. Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 1.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-pho-Y066-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Catherine Mannick
Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 1.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-pho-Y066-opc



In the same picture, above Mannick’s head, there is a script logo appearing on numerous works from 1986: “B(L)ack art”. However, in these works, the “L” is not put in brackets, but acts as a dotted separator between B and a, so that the word can also be read as Back art. “B(L)ack art” reproduces this double reading through the use of brackets.

In an article from 2012, I used this logo to determine Kozlov’s specific style from the period of 1985 to 1987, which adapted elements of graffiti art and sequential art (comic strips).[8]

    [B(L)ACK ART] expresses the subversive humour which is characteristic of this stylistic period. This is humour with an aggressive note, both subtle and blunt, ambiguous and direct – a special kind of black humour.[9] B(L)ACK ART has the refined aesthetics of understatement which affects naivety and spontaneity – street art, back art. […] Another feature of B(L)ACK ART is the use of fonts and text or, rather, of letter-like, onomatopoeic strings of characters as “speaking” symbols: zigzagging ribbons, loops, spirals, asterisks, and so on. There are drawings that anticipate the composition and style of B(L)ACK ART from as early as 1980 more >>.[10]

In this paragraph, I related “black” to black humour and “back” to the subversive, anarchical aspect of Kozlov’s style, as it goes beyond established motifs. But the Black art / Back art pun can, of course, be interpreted in different ways, depending on what one connects with the terms “black” and “back”.

The T-shirt “Napravlenie”, Kozlov’s gift from 1985, is a different example of B(L)ack art. Instead of graffiti painting, the artist used his earlier more geometrical (“zigzagging”) new wave style (see Letter G) to create a play on words and meaning typical for the New Artists.

The front shows the back of a walking female figure with evening gloves, while the reverse shows the front of a standing male figure wearing a costume and top hat. In his uplifted left hand, he is holding two letters, ready to throw them into the air like paper planes. Accordingly, the female figure is hurrying to catch them before they fall down.

Napravlenie, “direction”, a Russian word written in Latin letters next to the female figure, is short for “Новое направление” / “New Direction”, which designates a new style in fashion, as in one of Kozlov’s collages from 1984 for the illustrated New Artists magazine more >>. On the T-shirt, however, Napravlenie can be understood literally, as the female figure’s movement from here to there, from the front to the back of the T-shirt.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov T-shirt "Napravlenie", front Mixed media on cotton, 1985 Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University E-E archival number: E-E-185030-f (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov T-shirt "Napravlenie", reverse Mixed media on cotton, 1985 Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University E-E archival number: E-E-185030-r

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

T-shirt "Napravlenie", front
Mixed media on cotton, 1985

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-185030-f
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

T-shirt "Napravlenie", reverse
Mixed media on cotton, 1985

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-185030-r



The script on the sleeves, BACK and ART, respectively, support such an interpretation. The “missing” letter L of B(L)ack art can be found in the carefully designed word NAPRAVLENIE – as a fine angular line separating NAPRAV and ENIE.

At that time, Kozlov enjoyed carrying out semantic and phonetic experiments with Russian and English words and syllables, which he systematically worked out in numerous sketches. It is a creative game he has been returning to ever since, especially in his large cycles “Fairy-tale” (1982-2007, more >>) and “Century XX” (since 1989, more >>).

In Catherine Mannick’s collection, now part of the Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, there are four painted photo-collages from 1986 entitled B(L)ack art on the reverse. Two of these works are portraits of Timur Novikov – portraits in a larger sense – and the other two show street views with New Composers Valery Alakhov and Igor Verichev. The latter display fragments of German texts which can also be seen on two larger – untitled – works on paper from the same period (E-E-186010 and E-E-186011 more >>).

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Timur Novikov Painted photo-collage, 1986 Signed and entitled B(L)ack art on the reverse  This example of Kozlov's B(L)ack art style is from the “Timur on Horseback” series more>.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-186079 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Timur Novikov AFRI Painted photo-collage and frottage, 1986 Signed and entitled B(L)ack art on the reverse  This example of Kozlov's B(L)ack art style is from the “Timur on Horseback” series more>.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-186098

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Timur Novikov
Painted photo-collage, 1986
Signed and entitled B(L)ack art on the reverse

This example of Kozlov's B(L)ack art style is from the “Timur on Horseback” series more >>.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-186079
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Timur Novikov AFRI
Painted photo-collage and frottage, 1986
Signed and entitled B(L)ack art on the reverse

This example of Kozlov's B(L)ack art style is from the “Timur on Horseback” series more >>.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-186098

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  B(L)ack art. Man New Composers Valery Alakhov (left) and Igor Verichev (right)  Painted photo-collage, 1986  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-186099 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  B(L)ack art. Man  Reverse of painted photo-collage, 1986  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-186099

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

B(L)ack art. Man
New Composers Valery Alakhov (left) and Igor Verichev (right)

Painted photo-collage, 1986

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-186099
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

B(L)ack art. Man

Reverse of painted photo-collage, 1986

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-186099

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  B(L)ack art. Woman New Composers Valery Alakhov (left) and Igor Verichev (right) Painted photo-collage, 1986  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-186100 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Untitled Ballpen, pencil, and ink on paper, 14.2 x 9.6 cm, 1986 or earlier.  Kozlov received this note from someone else. It displays German sample sentences – with some minor spelling mistakes – to be used in a romantic correspondence.  Russian translations are given in brackets. The artist copied the last two sentences for the photo-collages left and above. Amost all sentences appear in two larger works from the same period (E-E-186010 and E-E-186011 more>).  E-E- archival number: E-E-186091

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

B(L)ack art. Woman
New Composers Valery Alakhov (left) and Igor Verichev (right)
Painted photo-collage, 1986

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-186100
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Untitled
Ballpen, pencil, and ink on paper, 14.2 x 9.6 cm, 1986 or earlier.

Kozlov received this note from someone else. It displays German sample sentences – with some minor spelling mistakes – to be used in a romantic correspondence. Russian translations are given in brackets. The artist copied the last two sentences for the photo-collages left and above.
Amost all sentences appear in two larger works from the same period (E-E-186010 and E-E-186011 more >>).

E-E- archival number:
E-E-186091



The lettering B(L)ack art actually appears as a graphic element only in 1986, and even then, only on some of the paintings, works on paper and painted photographs that can be described by its features. For instance, as a logotype, B(L)ack art is present in just one of the eight painted pictures from Letter L, but its features can be found in all of them. In terms of content, they display humour, ambiguity, and the struggle of polarities. In terms of style, their rhythmical, dynamic lines and hatches create fast tempi that could be considered as “punk” if the compositions weren’t worked out in every detail. Most likely, the artist himself determined them all as B(L)ack Art. The letters B.AN, followed by a letraset (transfer letter) number and added in bracket at the lower right corner of a text page, must be an abbreviation of B(L)ack Art Number. (The respective number peeled off on some of the pages.)

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Text fragment from his painting “Когда вы начинаете чувствовать мускулы! / When You Start to Feel Muscles!”, 1986 (see below)  E-E- archival number: E-E-186019

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Text fragment from his painting
“Когда вы начинаете чувствовать мускулы! / When You Start to Feel Muscles!”, 1986 (see below)

The title seems to have been inspired by a cut-out from an American magazine Kozlov used for a collage from 1984 for the fashion section of an illustrated New Artists magazine. The fragment shows several body builders next to the text line "When you start piling on muscles"
more >>.

E-E- archival number:
E-E-186019



There are two outstanding examples of Kozlov’s B(L)ack art paintings from 1986  carrying not the B(L)ack art logo, but different scripts reflected by the respective titles: “Когда вы начинаете чувствовать мускулы! / When You Start to Feel Muscles!” and “CCCP-USA”. Their destinies were also different. The first is in the collection of the Russian Museum, Saint Petersburg, the second was later destroyed by the artist (see Letter K).

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Когда вы начинаете чувствовать мускулы! / When You Start to Feel Muscles! Mixed media on canvas, 118 x 158.8 cm, 1985/1986  Russian Museum, Saint Petersburg  E-E- archival number: E-E-186019 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  CCCP-USA. Oil on canvas, approx. 160 x 110 cm, 1986. Photo: Catherine Mannick, October 1986  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University (photo)   E-E archival number (painting): E-E-186026

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Когда вы начинаете чувствовать мускулы! / When You Start to Feel Muscles!
Mixed media on canvas, 118 x 158.8 cm, 1985/1986

Russian Museum, Saint Petersburg

E-E- archival number:
E-E-186019
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

CCCP-USA.
Oil on canvas, approx. 160 x 110 cm, 1986.
Photo: Catherine Mannick, October 1986

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University (photo)

E-E archival number (painting): E-E-186026



Among Leningrad’s New Artists, graffiti and comic art was almost a general trend, perhaps stimulated by their interest in collages and artists’ books. Both genres became very popular in the mid 1980s, and artists often collaborated for joint works, for example when re-designing printed journals and books.[11]

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  THE ART OF MY CHILDHOOD  Paintings on a double page from V. A Kriuchkova's book from 1985 “Anti-art. Theory and practise of avnat-garde movements. / В.А. Крючкова. «Антиискусство: Теория и практика авангардистских движений». Left: Jim Dine. “Car Crash". Happening 1960. Right Allan Kaprow “Courtyard”. Happening, 1962. igor Verichev  Paintings on a double page with works by Pablo Picasso from V. A Kriuchkova's book from 1985 “Anti-art. Theory and practise of avnat-garde movements. / В.А. Крючкова. «Антиискусство: Теория и практика авангардистских движений».  Left and top right: Etchings from the Vollard Suite (Minotaur, 1933) Bottom right Minotauromachy. Etching, 1935.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

THE ART OF MY CHILDHOOD

Paintings on a double page from V. A Kriuchkova's book from 1985 “Anti-art. Theory and practise of avnat-garde movements. / В.А. Крючкова. «Антиискусство: Теория и практика авангардистских движений».
Left: Jim Dine. “Car Crash". Happening 1960.
Right Allan Kaprow “Courtyard”. Happening, 1962.
External link >>
igor Verichev

Paintings on a double page with works by Pablo Picasso from V. A Kriuchkova's book from 1985 “Anti-art. Theory and practise of avnat-garde movements. / В.А. Крючкова. «Антиискусство: Теория и практика авангардистских движений».

Left and top right: Etchings from the Vollard Suite (Minotaur, 1933)
Bottom right Minotauromachy. Etching, 1935.
External link >>



But when it came to style, approaches differed. B(L)ack art is specific with respect to some important technical aspects as well as regarding the aesthetics of lettering. Technical aspects concern resource material in the first place. Kozlov frequently used his own photographs – in a literal sense in his painted photos or photo collages and as an inspiration for a painting or for a fragment of a painting.[12] Patterns scratched directly into the negative film emulsion, when it is still soft after the chemical processing more>>, provide motion lines and emanata — sequential art features that visualise emotion when applied to characters more>>.

Lettering generates carefully planned ornamentations. For instance, the words B(L)ack art may appear as a handwritten chain of rounded, three-dimensional letters, as if they had been laid out with a rope. In this way, the sign quality of text, its reference to something else, fuses with its visual quality as an image. Accordingly, text can be perceived both ways, as a sign as well as an image, and its function remains indeterminate.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Untitled Ink on paper, 71.8 x 45.3 cm, 1986  Detail with B(l)ack art inscription  E-E archival number E-E-186081 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986. Detail with B(l)ack art inscription Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 1  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-pho-Y066-opc.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Untitled
Ink on paper, 71.8 x 45.3 cm, 1986
Detail with B(l)ack art inscription

E-E archival number E-E-186081
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.
Detail with B(l)ack art inscription
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 1

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-pho-Y066-opc
.



Such a twofold property of letters as sign and image becomes apparent in the pictures of Letter L, three of which are supplied with an additional “CCCP”  (USSR) design – respectively, with CCCCP and CCCCCCP designs.

On Yevgeny Yufit‘s shirt, the letters “CCCP” are inscribed like huge medals (page six). In the picture with Natalia Pivovarova (page seven), Kozlov applied the letters CCCCCCP to her catsuit – vertically, all the way down, like a band of buttons. In the picture with Alakhov, Mannick, and Guryanov (page five), the artist arranged the five letters CCCCP on Guryanov‘s coat in a pattern similar to that of the five dots on the face of a dice. Using transfer letters, he placed two words on top of it, “ПоПс из”, so that it now reads “ПоПс из ССССР”  — PoPs from the USSSR.[13]

Transfer letters also determine the three figures in the picture from page three: in the centre, Катя (Katia, Catherine Mannick), on the right, ВалЕрраа (ValErraaa / Valera Alakhov) and, on the left, an unidentified phantom simply called оно (ono, “it”). The names ono (left) and ValErraaa (right) are pointing upward, like the legs of a triangle, with Katia forming its horizontal tip. In this way, the letters shape a kind of gable roof sheltering the figures. With the exception of Mannick’s face and hands, which show the original surface of the photograph, the picture has been entirely overpainted. It is framed at the top with a handwritten ACCA (ASSA) line which reappears at the bottom, less strikingly.

At first glance, Kozlov’s lettering reminds the viewer of the explicative (reference) function of a text in sequential art. Yet his individual approach to script – as a sign as well as an image – becomes apparent when contrasting it with Roy Lichtenstein’s now famous paintings from the early 1960s (Drowning Girl, Masterpiece, Hopeless, and others). Lichtenstein used speech balloons for text, which he adapted, together with the corresponding images, from other authors. In this way, the functions of text and image are clearly separated: texts provide the message of the image and an image becomes an illustration to a text. Yet an illustration, an image tends to become a message, too, a sign – Pop art. Kozlov, on the other hand, intersperses images with text or text symbols, thus making them constructive elements of an image. Put differently, Roy Lichtenstein’s images tend to become signs, while E-E Kozlov’s signs tend to become images.

Besides, Kozlov asserts that he never looked at a single comic-book. “In the Soviet Union, there were no comic-books – what came closest was the Krokodil magazine, a satirical magazine with caricatures serving political propaganda or criticising some local bureaucrat or nonconformist behaviour. It wasn’t always very funny. On top of that, stylistically, these caricatures were quite traditional. On the other hand, comic-books weren’t considered as a valuable gift to be smuggled in from abroad. Most foreigners visiting the Soviet Union were educated people, and in those years, comic-books were regarded as trash. With regard to western culture, books on art and records set the standard.”

It is not that the artist was totally unaware of the existence of comic strips – rather, what he saw didn’t leave a lasting impression on him.[14] Around that time, Kozlov started to create his own graphic novel, but didn’t pursue the project further. Two – undated – pages have remained. The pencil drawings, carried out in a semi-realistic manner, show elegant dandified figures inspired by Kozlov’s own photographs of Georgy Guryanov and Sergei Bugaev. They also include quadrangular spaces for text. Stylistically, they are very different from the graffiti approach of B(L)ack art and much closer to Kozlov’s “New Wave” drawings from 1984 (see Letter G). Later, in 1988, this semi-realistic style finds a new, painterly expression in Kozlov’s large multifigure compositions more >>.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Untitled (Drawings for a graphic novel) Crayon, pencil, felt-tip pen, and ink on paper , 28.9 x 20.1 cm, 1986 or earlier  E-E archival number: E-E-186092 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Untitled (Drawing for a graphic novel) Collage, crayon, pencil, felt-tip pen, and ink on paper, 14.9 x 20 cm, 1986 or earlier  E-E archival number: E-E-186093

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Untitled (Drawings for a graphic novel)
Crayon, pencil, felt-tip pen, and ink on paper , 28.9 x 20.1 cm, 1986 or earlier

E-E archival number: E-E-186092
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Untitled (Drawing for a graphic novel)
Collage, crayon, pencil, felt-tip pen, and ink on paper, 14.9 x 20 cm, 1986 or earlier

E-E archival number: E-E-186093



Both styles looks very trendy and hip, but in 1985, B(L)ack art took the lead. So if we do away with comic art, what else can be said about international sources of B(L)ack art, provided there were any?

Kozlov’s body of works has mostly been figurative, with a strong narrative element, which sparked his interest in the works of Jean-Michel Basquiat, Kenny Scharf and Keith Haring. He translated into Russian Art After Midnight: The East Village Scene, Steven Hager’s book from 1986 which, apart from colourful accounts of the New York art and club scene of the 1970s and 1980s, contains a number of art reproductions. But when did he actually translate it, and what exactly did he know of these artists in 1985, when he turned to B(L)ack art?

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  ART AFTER MIDNIGHT. Exercise book with Kozlov's translation of Steven Hager's book from 1986. Cover. Ink and ballpen on paper, 20.5 x 17.7 x 1 cm, second half of the 1980s. (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  ART AFTER MIDNIGHT. Translation of Steven Hager's book from 1986. Chapter 2. NEW WAVE. VAUDVILLE  Ink on paper. Second half of the 1980s

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

ART AFTER MIDNIGHT.
Exercise book with Kozlov's translation of Steven Hager's book from 1986.
Cover. Ink and ballpen on paper, 20.5 x 17.7 x 1 cm, second half of the 1980s.
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

ART AFTER MIDNIGHT. Translation of Steven Hager's book from 1986.
Chapter 2. NEW WAVE. VAUDVILLE

Ink on paper. Second half of the 1980s



There is no obvious answer. All that can be said is that Kozlov, like his fellow artists, was familiar with contemporary western art at least to some degree through books and occasional exhibitions, although stating “to some degree” is not saying very much, as long as there are no precise references.[15] Perhaps what helps us further is to realise that B(L)ack art was part of a larger international trend: artist and art-historian Andrey Khlobystin sets the New Artists in the context of such movements as East Village artists (USA), Figuration Libre (France), Die Neuen Wilden (Germany) and Transavangarde (Italy), generally considered as Neo-Expressionism.[16]

But what makes B(L)ack art particularly attractive is that it represented current international trends with compellingly original images. When we compare Kozlov’s compositions with those of his contemporaries, we notice his powerful individual position and style, as distinctive as those of Basquiat, Scharf, or Haring – PoPs from the CCCCP.

Hannelore Fobo, 3 August 2023



[1] Since Kozlov had no telephone at home, the idea was that she would call his friend Kolya and that Kozlov would call him to find out more.

[2] booklooker describes the book as “A survey of American postwar painting and sculpture focuses on major artists, including Pollock, Rothko, Oldenburg, Johns, Warhol, and Motherwell”.

[3] The Beatles – P.S. I Love You

[4] See Michael Benson, Rolling Stone, December 4, 1986: UB40 in the U.S.S.R: [UB40] did know it would be one of the first big tours of the country by a major band from the West, with six gigs in Leningrad, six in Moscow. External link >>

[5] In 2017, Kozlov remembered an exhibition of American artists at the Hermitage, which took place in 1983 or somewhat earlier. He spoke of the strong impact on him made by paintings in a ten-metre format. The exhibition could not be identified.
E-E Kozlov, Diary IV, note to pp 68/69 more >>

[6] The artist nevertheless found a way to use the tiny space of "Galaxy Gallery", his Peterhof flat, for large works. In 1987, he carried out the painting "CCCP" in a two by six metre format on two adjacent walls more>>. The work is now in the collection of the Tate Gallery, London.

[7] The album also includes some other painted prints from the Pop Mekhanika “Goat” concert, one of them with Joanna Stingray, Viktor Tsoy, and Mariana Tsoy.

[8] Note that not all works from this period were carried out in this style.

[9] It is important to emphasise that Kozlov’s “humour with an aggressive note” is creative and not destructive. Put differently, here, aggressive means assertive and autonomous as opposed to passive or being manipulated by others.

[10] For instance, E-E-180074, a drawing depicting a cosmonaut falling to earth more>>.

[11] See also: Andreeva, Ekaterina. “ASSAmblage as an operative principle” in: The New Artists. Edited by Ekaterina Andreeva and Nelly Podgorskaya. Moscow: Moscow Museum of Modern Art, 2012, pp 57-75

[12] A distinguishing feature of E-E Kozlov’s art is that a work of art, once accomplished, can itself become a resource for a follow-up work. See: Hannelore Fobo. E-E Kozlov. The Atlas of Ontology (2021) more>>

[13] In the same picture, Alakhov is holding up a “smiling sickle", a symbol that already appeared in the painting “Animated Films” from 1985 (Letter I). Kozlov later used it for T-shirts and paintings more>>.

[14] In Kozlov’s archive, there are two pictures from 1985 / 1986 of a girl leafing through a magazine. A closer look (a very close look) at the pictures reveals that it is a comic book with a text in French. In 1987, the artist overpainted one of the vintage prints, giving it the title of a work on paper from 1986, “Sex Industrial Style”. While the magazine became an important structural element of the composition, its content plays no role in it, and Kozlov doesn’t remember it, either.

[15] A rare piece of information is in Kozlov’s diary from 1983 p. 68, where he mentions an exhibition of West-German artists in Leningrad and includes the names of some of the artists (Lüpertz, Middendorf, Baselitz, Kiefer) together with the titles of their works. However, these works have no relation to graffiti art.

[16] See Andrey Khlobystin, Schizorevolution, p. 30. On the same page, the author considers веселая брутальность / hilarious brutality to be a common denominator for the New Artists’ graffiti style, as opposed to the намерено и синтетическо / intentional and synthetic style of their American colleagues Basquiat and Warhol. However, following this categorical distinction, B(L)ack art remains closer to American art than to Leningrad art. 

Khlobystin, Andrey. Шизореволюция. Очерки петербургской культуры второй половины ХХ века. / Schizorevolution. Essays on the Petersburg culture of the second half of the twentieth century. 2017, Borey Art Center, Saint Petersburg, p. 30




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Catherine Mannick Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986. Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 1.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-pho-Y066-opc ((E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Catherine Mannick Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 1. Probably written not directly on the reverse of painted vintage print (left), but on a piece of paper attached to it. 10 x 15 cm, 1986.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number: E-E-pho-Y066-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Catherine Mannick
Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 1.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-pho-Y066-opc
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Catherine Mannick
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 1.
Probably written not directly on the reverse of painted vintage print (left), but on a piece of paper attached to it. 10 x 15 cm, 1986.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number: E-E-pho-Y066-opc

Page 1

Дорогая моя Катя!

Поздравляю тебя с Днем Рождения!

Эту веселую серию фото сделал специально для твоего праздника! Тебе нравится? Хотел, чтобы ты снова вспомнил ярко меня и Ленинград — те впечатления, развлечения, встречи, ту духовную атмосферу, которую создавал для тебя здесь. Другие люди на картинах,  кого ты не знаешь — это наш Halloween (да и все остальное тоже, как ты думаешь?)




 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Pop Mekhanika performance, 20 October 1986, Leningrad Palace of Youth. From left to right: Andrey Krisanov, Sergei Bugaev, Ágnes Fehdenfeld-Horváth, Andrey Medvedev, Inal Savchenkov more>> Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 2  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-AO26-opc2

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Pop Mekhanika performance, 20 October 1986, Leningrad Palace of Youth.
From left to right: Andrey Krisanov, Sergei Bugaev, Ágnes Fehdenfeld-Horváth, Andrey Medvedev, Inal Savchenkov more>>
Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 2

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-AO26-opc2

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 2 Reverse of painted vintage print (above), 10 x 15 cm, 1986.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-AO26-opc2

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 2
Reverse of painted vintage print (above), 10 x 15 cm, 1986.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-AO26-opc2

Page 2

Мне жаль, что у нас нет официально Halloween в какой-то из дней года, но просто думал, что в Союзе Halloween каждый день! Но как ты праздновала свой день Рождения, как Лондон, Cambridge, как прошло твоя акклиматизация дома?

Я до сих пор не могу открыть себя для будничной жизни здесь, после наших встреч. Нет, конечно, я общаюсь с друзьями и просто людьми, гуляю по улицам, хожу в кино, на




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Catherine Mannick and New Composer Valery Alakhov Painted vintage print and transfer letters, 15 x 10 cm, 1986. Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 3  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number E-E-pho-Y067-opc (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 3 Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (left)  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E- archival number E-E-pho-Y067-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Catherine Mannick and New Composer Valery Alakhov
Painted vintage print and transfer letters, 15 x 10 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 3

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number E-E-pho-Y067-opc
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 3
Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (left)

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E- archival number E-E-pho-Y067-opc

Page 3

концерты, рисую (как видишь) — живу, но все это происходит уже на другом уровне, как будто в другом мире, другой стране — это даже нельзя назвать отчуждением или отвержением окружения, происходит то, что мой мир, мое состояние, мой покой и беспокойства, гармония моей жизни изменились. Мне было очень важно и нужно видеть тебя и говорить с тобой, и я глубоко от всего сердца благодарен тебе за твой приезд. Все




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Catherine Mannick, (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, and Georgy Guryanov Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 4  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y017-opc2  The same print, but with a different design, is in Kozlov‘s album "It’s the Fashion" (1984-1990). See above.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Catherine Mannick, (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, and Georgy Guryanov
Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 4

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y017-opc2

The same print, but with a different design, is in Kozlov‘s album "It’s the Fashion" (1984-1990). See above.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (above) Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 4.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y017-opc2

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (above)
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 4.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y017-opc2

Page 4

получилось именно так, как мы хотели и хотя было слишком мало времени, я понял, что ты именно тот человек, кому действительно важно кто Я и что Я – как человек, как личность, что тебе могу довериться во всем и встречу поддержку и понимание.

Сейчас мне кажется, что я слишком много говорил о себе и не успел слушать тебе, если так, то прости меня. Поверь, я хотел узнать о тебе все




Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University
 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  ПоПс из ССССР – PoPs from the USSSR  Valery Alakhov, Catherine Mannick, and Georgy Guryanov Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 5.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y018-opc2  The same print, but with a different design, is in Kozlov‘s album "It’s the Fashion" (1984-1990)

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

ПоПс из ССССР – PoPs from the USSSR

Valery Alakhov, Catherine Mannick, and Georgy Guryanov
Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 5.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y018-opc2

The same print, but with a different design, is in Kozlov‘s album "It’s the Fashion" (1984-1990) more>>
.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 5. Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (above)  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y018-opc2

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 5.
Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (above)

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y018-opc2

Page 5

и мне было важно это для того чтобы лучше узнать себя и тебя и быть способным что-то делать в будущем. Мы действительно способны помогать друг другу, особенно, если ты чувствуешь, при встречах. И мои перемены, моя гармония с собой сейчас мне нравятся. А вот что делать с творчеством, я не знаю. Мне не хватает поля деятельности, масштаба, негде развернуться именно того, о чем уже говорил с




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Yevgeny Yufit Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 6.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BX14-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Yevgeny Yufit
Painted vintage print, 10 x 15 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 6.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BX14-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (above) Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 6.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BX14-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (above)
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 6.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BX14-opc

Page 6

тобой, вернее не успел говорить, только так слегка пожаловался. Я, Катя, задыхаюсь. Знаешь это гнетущее состояние? У тебя есть возможность вылить свою энергию в работу, а у меня нет. Я мечтаю о времени и месте, где смогу писать десятиметровые полотна, краски, много красок, в огромных банках — они сводят меня с ума. Я могу, хочу, должен выразить себя! Только это




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Pop Mekhanika 1986. Natalya Pivovarova (right) Painted vintage print, 15 x 10 cm, 1986. Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 7.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number E-E-pho-AO34-opc (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 7. Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (left)  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number E-E-pho-AO34-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Pop Mekhanika 1986. Natalya Pivovarova (right)
Painted vintage print, 15 x 10 cm, 1986.
Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 7.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number E-E-pho-AO34-opc
More about the performance >>
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 7.
Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (left)

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number E-E-pho-AO34-opc

Page 7

действие раскроет меня по-настоящему, иначе конец, все зря, вся жизнь — сон и туман. И никакого облегчения от слов, только еще больше раскаляют — ужас, кошмар — АССА (read the article about АССА /ASSA>>). Об этом больше не могу писать. Потом буду подробнее, в следующий раз.

 Встречался с Андреем и Людой, они передают тебе привет и благодарность за подарки. На днях у Андрея будет День Рождения, вот в этот день мы   

Halloween




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Pop Mekhanika 1986. Katya Liverovskaya Painted vintage print, 1986.  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 8.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number E-E-pho-AO23-opc (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 8. Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (left)  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number E-E-pho-AO23-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Pop Mekhanika 1986. Katya Liverovskaya
Painted vintage print, 1986.

Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 8.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number E-E-pho-AO23-opc
More about the performance >>
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter L to Catherine Mannick from late October 1986, page 8.
Text on the reverse of the painted vintage print (left)

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number E-E-pho-AO23-opc

Page 8

выпьем ликер из B.S. за его и твое здоровье.

Оказывается Андрей уже почти бросил курить, но после того, как я передал ему Camel планы сразу изменились. Вообще у них все идет хорошо.

Видел и Яна, он рассказал, что Маринина мама очень волнуется перед путешествием, стал совсем нервной. Но надеюсь, у нее все будет хорошо.

Моя мама тоже передает тебе привет, она очень хотела тебя видет. Ну устроим встречу в следующий раз.

Обнимаю и целую тебя, Женя.

Halloween




USA-CCCP. Points of Contact.
Part 1: Introduction
Synopsis • Preliminary Remarks
1. From Leningrad to Boston and Back
2. Let’s Talk About Art. New Wave, New Artists, and B(L)ack art
3. Perestroika Emissaries
4. The End of Censorship
5. “It Seems I Need a Manager.” The Impact of Getting Popular
6. Leningrad Artists and Musicians in E-E Kozlov's Pictures
— The River of Forgetfulness, 1988 —
Part 2: Letters
Letter A (1979) – Halloween
Letter B (1980) – To Be at Peace with Yourself
Letter C (1980) – Harlequin
Letter D (1982) – The Sea and the Countryside
Letter E (1983) – Saigon
Letter F (1983) – Moscow
Letter G (1984) – New Wave
Letter H (1985) – New Composers
Letter I (1986) – Happy New Year at the Leningrad Rock Club
Letter J (1986) – CCCP-USA
Letter K (1986) – The Price of Art
Letter L (1986) – B (L)ack art • PoPs from the USSSR
Letter M (1986) – A Taste for Colours
Letter N (1987) – Part 1: Changes and Challenges
Letter N (1987) – Part 2: ASSA
Letter O (1988) – Joanna Stingray's Wedding
Letter P (1989) – Perestroika Hot News
Letter Q (1989) – Russkoee Polee • The Russian Field
Letter R (1990) – New Classicals
Epilogue: USA-CCCP. Points of Contact (Forthcoming)

see also
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, Catherine Mannick, and Hannelore Fobo papers, 1979-2022 (inclusive)
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection Harvard University >>

up

Published 8 August 2023
Last updated 7 June 2024
An earlier, short introduction to Letter L was published 4 July 2022