(E-E) Ev.g.e.n.i.j ..K.o.z.l.o.     Berlin                                                  


      (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov: Leningrad 80s • No.115 >>

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection • Harvard University

USA-CCCP. Points of Contact.
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov – Catherine Mannick
Correspondence 1979 – 1990

Text and Research: Hannelore Fobo, 2021/2024

Letter N – Part 1 (1987): Changes and Challenges

previous page: Letter M (1986) – A Taste for Colours

next page: Letter N – Part 2 (1987): ASSA



Letter N (Autumn 1987) – Part 1: Changes and Challenges

In the cultural world of Leningrad, the political changes in the USSR generally known as “glasnost” and “perestroika” showed their first effects as early as 1986, and in 1987, they could no longer be overlooked. They were particularly important for “unofficial” artists like (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, since “unofficials” were subject to legal restrictions to a greater extent than those recognised by the state. Pursuing a new policy, the state loosened the tight grip on them and conceded them more autonomy.

A striking example is the “Law on amateur associations and interest clubs” from 13 May 1986, which allowed groups of individuals to register their joint activities with a local institution. This led to the emergence of a number of new “clubs”, among them the “Club of Friends of Mayakovsky”, initiated by the New Artists more>>, and the NCh-VCH (НЧ-ВЧ, an acronym for Nizkie Chastoty / Vysokie Chastoty, Low Frequency / High Frequency), a cultural club providing artist studios and a clubroom for exhibitions and concerts more>>.

But this was not the only reason why those creating the so-called counter-culture benefited from perestroika. Paradoxically, they also enjoyed a larger number of international contacts than many of their “official” colleagues – at least in Moscow and Leningrad, both cultural centres with an important number of foreign students and diplomatic missions. This started to pay off in the second half of the 1980s, when international cultural relations were taking an upswing. If the Soviet side was ready to invite western pop bands – like UB40 in 1986, see Letter L >> – and increased the screening of western movies, western institutions and private organisations were looking for fresh impulses coming from people outside the system. Leningrad’s underground artists and musicians finally saw a chance to show their works or perform abroad, thus asserting themselves in the capitalist market. This, however, demanded skills few Soviet artists had mastered by intuition. In Letter N, Kozlov reflects these changes on a personal level.

The first page or pages are missing, and therefore, the date is also missing, but it is possible to infer an approximate date. The artist mentions Chagall’s first personal exhibition after his emigration, which opened at the Pushkin Museum on 2 September 1987 – a significant event for Kozlov, as Chagall had always been one of his favourite artists.  Mannick’s answer to Letter N comes with her New Year’s greetings (Letter 41). Therefore, Letter N must have been written some time in autumn 1987. Possibly, Kozlov’s birthday greetings, written on a picture showing him with a recent painting entitled “Китай – СССР” / China – USSR, were also part of Letter N.

 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  The artist in front of his painting China - USSR (1987) more >> wearing his T-shirt from 1987 CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCP more >> Vintage print, 17.8 x 23.8 cm, 1987 Possible sent with Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-EF11-op3

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

The artist in front of his painting China - USSR (1987) more >> wearing his T-shirt from 1987 CCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCP more >>
Vintage print, 17.8 x 23.8 cm, 1987
Possible sent with Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-EF11-op3
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  To – For Katerine with my GREAT Chinese Halloween Евгений Козлов „Китай-СССР“ 1987 (Evgenij Kozlov “China - USSR” 1987) Reverse of vintage print, 17.8 x 23.8 cm, 1987 Possibly sent with Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-EF11-op3
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

To – For Katerine with my GREAT Chinese Halloween
Евгений Козлов „Китай-СССР“ 1987 (Evgenij Kozlov “China - USSR” 1987)
Reverse of vintage print, 17.8 x 23.8 cm, 1987
Possibly sent with Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-EF11-op3



By that time, important changes had also occurred in Catherine Mannick’s life, and they were related to Russia. In September 1987, she had started her graduate programme in Russian history at Harvard University, to which she had been admitted a year earlier. She had previously written her friend that she continued working at a law office to finance her studies and therefore couldn’t make it to the Soviet Union for the time being (Letter 40, August 1987). Kozlov, although regretting that they both wouldn't meet very soon, again welcomed her decision, adding an enthusiastic note to it:

    I am glad that you have finally decided and started to seriously study Russian history and literature. Now you will be able to understand me better and especially our life. If you are thinking about the future, then think about Russia! (p.2, outside, left) 

“SAVE THE WORLD”

Letter N is one of Kozlov’s longer letters, perhaps because it was also the first letter sent in 1987; at least that’s what Mannick’s letter from August 1987 suggests.[1] It includes many of Kozlov’s vintage prints, both painted and not painted. Together, pictures and text provide a vivid impression of a significant moment in time.

Two painted prints are placed on the front cover pages of coloured double cards numbered 2 and 3, respectively, each offering another three blank pages for text. The pictures present, apart from Kozlov himself, New Composer Igor Verichev and Georgy Guryanov, drummer of the band KINO.[2] Kozlov took the pictures during a farewell meeting with their French friend Paquita Escofet Miro, who participated in the photo shoot.[3] In the Davis Center Collection, there is a third painted picture from the same series which might have belonged to the missing page 1, and some more are in Kozlov's album “Это модно • It's the fashion! 1984-1990” more>>.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Igor Verichev and (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Painted vintage print, 1987 Possibly part of Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987 (page 1). Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BZ63-opc

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Igor Verichev and (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Painted vintage print, 1987

Possibly part of Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987 (page 1).

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BZ63-opc



When painting his photos, Kozlov often combined opaque colours, such as marker or spray, with transparent ink (see Letter L >>). This is the case with the third picture, where spray paint fills the lower left corner. Following his statement “when I’m looking at black and white images, I see colours”, he applied ochre ink to arms and faces, except for white contours adapted from unpainted parts of the photograph, which gives these shapes a three-dimensional appearance. In the other two prints, he used translucent ink only, leaving the original motifs fully recognisable. The translucent effect of ink is particularly appealing where pink and turquoise ribbons and circles intersect each other, creating luminous shades of blue and violet. These ornamental features add rhythm and strangeness. (See also description of ink and alcohol-based ink in "The River of Forgetfulness", 1988.)

Six more – unpainted – vintage prints in a 10 x 14 cm format, numbered 4 to 9, are views of Timur Novikov’s art squat and gallery “ASSA”. Kozlov wrote his sentences directly on the reverse of these pictures.

1987 had been very a beneficial period for Kozlov’s art, possibly because towards the end of 1986, he finally quit his “official” job (see Letter K >>). In the small space of his studio, he was now creating  large works, up to a 6x2m format more>>.

    I really began to work a lot and you know why? Oddly enough, this is due to the fact that I have nothing but art (not even you next to me), this position obligates me to do more and more new things. And if I don't paint for a day or two or three, then I start to feel broken and sick. This is what interests me especially now! (p. 2, left and right)

He writes that he continues working on the CCCP-USA subject,[4]  and, also having included China and France, feels inclined to “process” (переработать) all major powers.

The “French” painting could not be identified, unlike the “Chinese” one – it is the one displayed in his birthday greetings.  “CHINA–USSR” depicts both countries as guitar players, and it is the counterpart to PCCC-ASU (USA-CCCP mirrored) from the same year, with an accordion player sitting inside a fenced area, perhaps a cage see Letter N Part 2 >>. These two paintings could be called personifications of large-territory states, similar to personifications of continents from the baroque period, only that their iconography is quite unusual and their attributes, especially the musicians’ shortened legs, remain a matter of interpretation.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov with his painting PCCC-ASU Mixed media on canvas, 160 x 196 cm, 1987 Exhibition USA-CCCP-CHINA • Works 1980-1989 Egbert Baqué Contemporary, Berlin more >> Photo: Hannelore Fobo, 2018

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov with his painting PCCC-ASU
Mixed media on canvas, 160 x 196 cm, 1987

Exhibition USA-CCCP-CHINA • Works 1980-1989
Egbert Baqué Contemporary, Berlin more >>
Photo: Hannelore Fobo, 2018



In a somewhat unexpected turn, Kozlov comes to a conclusion

    “SAVE THE WORLD” [СПАСЕМ МИР] is the most fashionable expression of this time and I would also add “SAVE EACH OTHER” [СПАСЕМ ДРУГ ДРУГА]. (p. 2, left)

In 1986, the slogan “Спасем мир” / Save the World became indeed very fashionable among Leningrad artists and musicians due to T-shirts with “СПАСЕМ МИР” printed in bold Cyrillic letters on the front and “SAVE THE WORLD” on the back. Igor Verichev is wearing one of these T-shirts in Kozlov’s coloured pictures. This might have stimulated Kozlov to promote the slogan in his letter. Or perhaps it was the other way round – Kozlov, being interested in world affairs, selected the pictures because of the slogan.

The shirts were a gift by Joanna Stingray, a dedicated supporter of the Leningrad underground rock and art scene since 1984, when she first traveled to Leningrad.[5] The young American rock singer never tired of bringing her friends all kinds of entertaining and useful presents, such as “a synthesizer for Sergey Kuryokhin, a strat for Yuri that shone like the winter sun, and a four track mixer.”[6] Among her gifts were art supplies – acrylic paint, canvases,[7] but also special liquids which Kozlov used to create frottage monoprints more >>.

Stingray printed the T-shirt to promote the release of the double LP “Red Wave”, an album she had produced in the United Stated in 1986 with tapes she had smuggled out from the Soviet Union; a copy of the Red Wave album is in the Davis Center Special Collection.

JOANNA STINGRAY PRESENTS: RED WAVE. 4 UNDERGROUND BANDS FROM THE USSR. Side A: AQUARIUM; Side B: KINO; Side C: ALISA; Side D: STRANGE GAMES. USA, Big Time Records, 1986 In 1986, Joanna Stingray released the first vinyl album of independent Leningrad rock groups  on Big Time Records, Los Angeles more >>; a copy of the Red Wave album is in the Davis Center Special Collection.

JOANNA STINGRAY PRESENTS: RED WAVE. 4 UNDERGROUND BANDS FROM THE USSR.
Side A: AQUARIUM; Side B: KINO; Side C: ALISA; Side D: STRANGE GAMES. USA, Big Time Records, 1986
In
1986, Joanna Stingray released the first vinyl album of independent Leningrad rock groups on Big Time Records, Los Angeles more >>; a copy of the Red Wave album is in the Davis Center Special Collection.



“Red Wave” featured the music of four Leningrad Rock bands – Alisa, Aquarium, KINO, and Strange Games. In her memoirs, Stingray remembers the production of “Red Wave”: “One of the most important details, though, was the ad on the inside sleeve for shirts that said ‘Save the World’ in Russian and English. They came with a free button that said “Peace” in both languages, something to signify the magnitude and urgency of the album”.[8]

According to Stingray, the T-shirt was first worn on stage by KINO members at the Palace of Youth “a week after the infamous Gorbachev/Reagan Peace Summit in Reykjavík”, that is, on 19 October 1986 more >>.”[9] The concert was recorded live and released on vinyl in 2022 as KINO/КИНО — «Спасём Мир» External link >>. In her book, Stingray, who performed with the band, quotes bandleader Viktor Tsoy addressing the audience: “We wanted to offset the non-agreement that took place in Reykjavík, Iceland, to demonstrate the fact that we do want peace and friendship with the United States more >>.”[10] A day later, on 20 October 1986, there was also a Pop Mekhanika concert at the Youth Palace, where Stingray again wore the shirt, as can be seen in Kozlov’s archival pictures.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov:  Joanna Stingray and Viktor Tsoy during a Pop Mekhanika performance at the Leningrad Palace of Youth, 20 October 1986.   E-E archival number: E-E-pho-AA11

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Joanna Stingray and Viktor Tsoy during a Pop Mekhanika performance at the Leningrad Palace of Youth, 20 October 1986 more >>.

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-AA11



The idea of “saving the world”, based on mutual understanding, was enthusiastically adapted by Stingray’s Leningrad friends, all the more so because the immense media echo in the western press to the release of “New Wave” forced the Soviet authorities to finally acknowledge the existence of an independent underground rock scene in their own country. In 1987, Aquarium received the first contract with the monopolist label Melodiya, and the other bands soon followed suit.[11]

Movies and Concerts

By 1987, “the world” was increasingly using official channels to present itself to the Soviet audience with films, concerts and exhibitions. 

Kozlov writes that he watched a number of movies coming to Leningrad from the Moscow Film Festival. Whether due to a preselection in Moscow or to the availability of tickets, his list of movies is quite eclectic, and in fact, none was part of the main festival competition: “Ragtime” (drama film, USA, 1981), “All that Jazz” (musical drama film, USA, 1979), “Crocodile Dundee” (action comedy, Australia, 1986), “A Tooth for a Tooth” (thriller, Germany, 1985[12]), and “The Fugitives” (Les Fugitifs, comedy, France, 1986). Western films were also screened at the local movie theatre of Peterhof (Petrodvorets), where the artist was living:

    Yesterday night I went to our Peterhof cinema to watch the American film “One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest”. Have you seen this movie? It takes place in a mental hospital[13] – there are no such films on the Soviet screen. The hall was full, and together with all the other spectators, I spent three interesting hours of my free time. Later I watched another film by this [director] Milos Forman – Amadeus, about Mozart and Salieri. (page 3, outside, left page, and p.4)

American/Soviet cultural exchanges were initiated November 1985, during the first encounter of president Ronald Reagan and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachov,[14] and Kozlov was hoping that this development would consolidate further. The meeting also set the framework for concerts tours of American musicians. But compared to screening films, organising concert tours was much more complicated because of significant expenses for logistics and live performances. Part of these expenses was incurred in hard currency, and since the ruble was not convertible, such tours had to be subsidised by one side or the other. This obviously limited the chances for the Soviet Goskontsert agency to welcome big stars, but in 1987, Soviet music lovers had a chance familiarise themselves with the music of avant-garde jazz musician Pat Metheny and singer and songwriter Billy Joel – both successful in the States, but less well-known in Russia.[15]

To sell the tickets, the concerts were promoted on radio and TV. Kozlov did not attend the concerts but mentioned both in his letter, giving a detailed report on Billy Joel’s appearance in the highly popular TV-programme “Музыкальный ринг” / Musical Ring, a term created in analogy to “boxing ring”. Broadcast by Leningrad’s “Fifth Channel”, “Musical Ring”, was quite progressive with regard to the Soviet Underground scene. In 1986, it featured Boris Grebenshikov and his band Aquarium External link >>, while Sergey Kuryokhin and Pop Mekhanika were guests in 1987 External link >>. Kozlov explains the concept of the show:

    There is a small platform for musicians in the centre of the hall, around which the audience is sitting, as in a boxing match, it’s almost a sport. And after each song, the audience begins to "beat" the musicians with their questions. (P. 3, inside, right page)

But it was not at all Joel’s music that attracted Kozlov’s attention. Rather, he was fascinated by the ease with which the American singer talked about the financial aspect of his performance:

    Usually musicians, Soviet musicians, try to play more music in order to get fewer punches / questions from listeners, because the questions may be rather sharp, but Joel did the opposite. At the very beginning, he said that he prefers to talk more than sing and that songs are money – and this was a strong blow to the listeners; we are not used to be treated in such a way. He had a great musical fight, but the funniest thing for me was when in the midst of audience questions, when everyone had got the hang of it and wanted to talk to him more and more, he suddenly stood up and said that his doctor and his manager advised him to go rest and stop this performance. No one expected this here – this cunning blow from his side was O.K., I even screamed: "Hurrah!“. And we were knocked down, especially the host of the TV show, especially since for some reason this program is hosted by a woman. And then all the spectators clapped, smiling shyly at their loss. America has won this musical battle. (P. 3, inside, right page, and p.3, outside, left page)

Art market and royalties

Getting in touch with the capitalist world inevitably meant fixing a monetary equivalent for one’s own art. For Kozlov, it started as a theoretical consideration. 

    [It would be] also interesting to know how much Soviet art usually costs in America? And is anyone really seriously interested in it, or is it just a fashion? I have a problem now – should I sell my paintings or keep everything. Because if circumstances are good and I can find some people who are interested, there could be an exhibition in, say, America or Europe. (page 2, inside, left page)

However, the financial aspect of art had yet another practical side – that of attaching value to the work of those who had jointly contributed to a production. Kozlov discussed it on the occasion of the release of the LP Popular Mechanics – Insect Culture by ARK Records, Liverpool, with had his photo on the cover. It is the main topic of Kozlov’s text on the reverse of his six “ASSA” Gallery vintage prints. Kozlov’s photo shoot for the LP with Sergey Kuryokhin and New Composers Igor Verichev and Valery Alakhov had taken place in 1985 more >>, and he had written about it in Letter H from October 1985 more >>. In the present letter, Kozlov complains that the text on the back cover of “Insect Culture” disregards the essential contribution of Alakhov and Verichev. Instead, the description focuses on Sergey Kuryokhin, although “all texts and clear melodies, with the exception of noises and saxophone are the work of Igor and Valery” (page 7).

In essence, Kozlov values Kuryohkin’s organisational talents and talents as a showman more than what he calls “Kuryokhin’s noises”.  “Kuryokhin is first of all an organiser, in this respect his creativity is making great strides here!” (page 7). This is where he sees Kuryokhin’s unique role in the Leningrad music scene. From here it follows that

    … in general, all the work, the entire arrangement of the record was done by Kuryokhin. Why? As I wrote to you before, he is an organiser and has connections with some western recording studios. The “New Composers” gave him their draft work and he did, according to his taste, what you can hear.[16] (Page 8)

What worries Kozlov even more is the fact that his own contribution to the LP was not duly rewarded. The artist himself had not been not involved in the process of selecting the picture for the cover, about which he had written in Letter H: “I suggested ten painted photos for the cover, what will not be used for the cover will be printed in one of the music or art magazines.”more >> In fact, apart from his – unpainted – picture used for the cover, another, painted one was printed in the July edition of the British magazine Blitz, next to Jonh [sic] Wilde’s review of “Insect Culture”, but without mentioning Kozlov’s name (но без указания авторства, page 6). It is impossible to tell whether this was done intentionally or unintentionally – Kozlov normally signs his works – but it wasn’t to be the last time one of his works was printed without a proper attribution to its author. Concerning royalties, Kozlov is searching for legal advice from his friend:

    Now what I would like to know from you regarding the legal side of my work. If I didn't sign a contract with ARK studio before the release of the record and with BLITZ magazine, then I don't get a fee for my work? Or is it still possible to fix it? And if it’s possible, how? (page 9)
Press review of Popular Mechanics – Insect Culture by Jonh Wilde (JW) in Blitz Magazine UK, July 1987, no 55, p. 22. On the left is a reproduction of (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov's painted vintage print with Sergey Kuryokhin, Valery Alakhov and Igor Verichev. The article doesn't mention the name of the artist. Read the article >>  Kozlov refers to the picture on pages 6 / 7 of Letter N – “In the picture you see...”. The description allows to conclude  that with his letter, a print of this picture was sent which no longer exists.

Press review of Popular Mechanics – Insect Culture by Jonh Wilde (JW) in Blitz Magazine UK, July 1987, no 55, p. 22.
On the left is a reproduction of (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov's painted vintage print with Sergey Kuryokhin, Valery Alakhov and Igor Verichev.
The article doesn't mention the name of the artist. Read the article >>

Kozlov refers to the picture on pages 6 / 7 of Letter N – “In the picture you see...”. The description allows to conclude that with his letter, a print of this picture was sent which no longer exists.



It is not known whether Colin Fallows of ARK Records or the editors of Blitz were aware of the fact that Kozlov expected them to pay him a licence fee. Neither knew Kozlov personally, and they had to rely on whatever information they received from intermediaries. What is more, in those years, it was considered a matter of prestige, not of money, for a Soviet underground artist to have their work printed in the West.

Besides, western companies promoting Soviet artists or musicians were often run as low budget projects, with their owners making only a small profit, if any. But even if they had been willing to pay some money, it wouldn’t have been easy to make sure that an author actually received the royalties, considering that there was no possibility of a bank transfer and that personal encounters were rare.

Lost art

On page 4, Kozlov returns once more to the question of exhibiting his works

    Yes, I forgot to tell you, soon we will have another exhibition in Sweden, Stockholm, and negotiations are underway with France and England. But, frankly speaking, I am more interested in the field of exhibition activities in the USA – in some ways, this country appeals to me more, perhaps, with its scope and excitement of life. (pp. 4/5)

The Swedish exhibition provides a striking example of how for Kozlov, “getting international” also meant losing control of his works. The exhibition was initiated in 1986 by Fredrik Vogel, a Danish curator and friend of several New Artists. He convinced Stockholm’s cultural department to pursue his project and to convert it into a festival of Leningrad’s non-official culture more >>. After overcoming multiple obstacles created by the Soviet bureaucracy, “De Nya från Leningrad / The New from Leningrad” finally opened at Stockholm’s cultural centre Kulturhuset in August 1988 with a Pop-Mekhanika performance, film screenings, and lectures more >>. The exhibition then travelled to Denmark and ended in Liverpool with another festival, “Perestroika in the Avant-Garde” more >>.

De Nya från Leningrad / "The New from Leningrad", Kulturhuset, Stockholm, 27 August to 25 September, 1988 more >> General exhibition view In the centre, mounted on a stand, "Хочу Е Я (и ЯЯ)” / I want her (and I I) by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov. On the right paintings by Evgenij Yufit.  Kozlov's painting did not continue the exhibition tour. It is on the list of works shown at another Stockholm exhibition later the same year consisting mainly of "New Artists" works: “Ryska Konstnärer från Leningrad” / Russian Artists from Leningrad, at Pierre Munkeborg Antik & Inredningar, Stockholm, December 1988 more >>. After the December 1988 exhibition, its traces have vanished.  Photo: Courtesy Fredrik Vogel

De Nya från Leningrad / "The New from Leningrad", Kulturhuset, Stockholm, 27 August to 25 September, 1988 more >>
General exhibition view
In the centre, mounted on a stand, "Хочу Е Я (и ЯЯ)” / I want her (and I I) by (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov.
On the right paintings by Evgenij Yufit.

Kozlov's painting did not continue the exhibition tour. It is on the list of works shown at another Stockholm exhibition later the same year consisting mainly of "New Artists" works: “Ryska Konstnärer från Leningrad” / Russian Artists from Leningrad, at Pierre Munkeborg Antik & Inredningar, Stockholm, December 1988 more >>. After the December 1988 exhibition, its traces have vanished.

Photo: Courtesy Fredrik Vogel



The exhibition tour was the first major presentation of Leningrad’s nonofficial culture in the West, and Kozlov’s paintings were featured on catalogue covers and posters (See Letter N Part 2 >>). However, of Kozlov’s eleven paintings that were sent to Sweden in August 1988, only four could be recovered in England after the end of the tour – in London, stored by the South London Gallery as a courtesy to the Liverpool Bluecoat Gallery. Kozlov later displayed them in his Berlin studio “The Russian Field No 2”.

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov in his studio “The Russian Field No 2”, Berlin, 1995.  Left: “Звезда. 6 Фигур” / Star. 6 Figures, white paint on red calico, 211 x 230 cm, 1987, retreived from London in the early 1990s, since 2021 in the collection of Tate Gallery, London. Centre: “1 000 000 осколков рая” / 1 000 000 Fragments of Heaven”, 1995, more >> Right: “Звезда” / Star, white paint on red calico, 207 x 225 cm, 1987, retrieved from London in the early 1990s, since 2021 in the collection of Tate Gallery, London.  Photo: Hannelore Fobo

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov in his studio “The Russian Field No 2”, Berlin, 1995.

Left: “Звезда. 6 Фигур” / Star. 6 Figures, white paint on red calico, 211 x 230 cm, 1987, retreived from London in the early 1990s, since 2021 in the collection of Tate Gallery, London.
Centre: “1 000 000 осколков рая” / 1 000 000 Fragments of Heaven”, 1995, more >>
Right: “Звезда” / Star, white paint on red calico, 207 x 225 cm, 1987, retrieved from London in the early 1990s, since 2021 in the collection of Tate Gallery, London.

Photo: Hannelore Fobo



In 2021, three of these paintings travelled back from Berlin to London, where they have now found a permanent home in the collection of Tate Gallery External link >>. Kozlov was able to retrieve two more paintings from different places; he later discovered that the other five had been sold – two in New York, and three (most likely) in Stockholm more >>.


Hannelore Fobo, 10 September 2023

Next page: Letter N (1987) Part 2: ASSA >>



[1] Mannick had received Kozlov’s Christmas letter (Letter M) in March, after a working trip to Paris (Letter 38). In June she stated that she hadn’t heard from him for a while (Letter 39), and in August, sending him her birthday wishes, wrote that she was hoping that everything was o.k. with him (Letter 40).

[2] Mannick had met Guryanov in 1986. Verichev and Guryanov appear in many of Kozlov’s portraits. They can be seen next to each other in “Shark”, a large work on canvas from 1988 more >>.

[3] At that time, Paquita Escofet Miro was working at the French embassy in Moscow. Being friends with many artists from the Moscow and Leningrad nonofficial art-scenes, she built up an important collection of contemporary Soviet art.

[4] The technique of applying translucent ink to vintage prints is also present in Kozlov’s large work on paper from 1987 entitled “CuCsCaP (Сто вопросов и ответов)” / CuCsCaP (A Hundred Questions and Answers), with the letters CCCP and USA being interlaced. The paper-based surface of a 171 x 354 cm format is made up of approximately 250 individual photographs containing images of Kozlov’s friends and acquaintances – artists and musicians – who remain partially visible underneath the paint. See Letter J and more >>

[5]    “I had made these black and white shirts for all the band guys that said “Save the World” in English on one side and in Russian on the other.” more >>

Joanna Stingray & Madison Stingray. Red Wave: an American in the Soviet Music Underground, Los Angeles, CA; DoppelHouse Press, 2020, p. 146. See also picture on p.237

[6]    Ibid., p. 54

[7]    Ibid., p. 63

[8]    Ibid., p. 116

[9]    Ibid., p. 146

[10] Ibid., p. 147.

[11]  For a detailed discussion of “Red Wave” and the impact it had on Boris Grebenshikov (Aquarium) and KINO see Hannelore Fobo. Joanna Stingray & Madison Stingray: Stingray in Wonderland. Introduction and Epilogue. (2019) more >>

[12] Kozlov wrote “Немецкий – „Око за Око“” – “the German movie ‘An Eye for an Eye’”. I couldn’t find a German film with this title from that period, but the Russian website film.ru translates the German thriller “Zahn um Zahn” as “Око за Око”.External link >>

[13] “в сумасшедшем доме”, literally “in a madhouse”

[14]  “The sides intend to expand the programs of bilateral cultural, educational and scientific-technical exchanges, and also to develop trade and economic ties.”

Joint Soviet-United States Statement on the Summit Meeting in Geneva, November 21, 1985 External link >>

[15] According to reviews published in American newspapers and websites, financial questions were solved in different ways. In her article in The Christian Science Monitor, 27 August, 1987, Amy Duncan writes

The Pat Metheny Group was invited to play in the USSR by the Soviet government – and the government paid them in American dollars. This in itself was a rare occurrence, since most musicians who play in the USSR are sponsored by the US State Department. External link >>

Billy Joel, on the other hand, financed a large part of the costs himself:

The Joel entourage would number more than 160 and cost about $2 million — guaranteed to lose money, although a documentary, a live album (1987's Kontsert) and an HBO broadcast of the final Leningrad show would make up the difference.

Gary Graff. 35 Years Ago: Billy Joel Makes History With Soviet Union Shows, July 26, 2022 External link >>

[16] In all likelihood, the New Composers’ “draft work” consisted nevertheless of achieved compositions. In Kozlov’s collection, there is a CD with tracks from 1985 and 1986,  Новые Композиторы – Ветер перемен / Перцепция Вербализация /New Composers – Winds of Change. Perception and Verbalisation. Kuryokhin used several of its tracks for Insect Culture, where he remixed them with his own improvisations as well as those of saxophonist Igor Butman.  more >>  

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Georgy Guryanov, Igor Verichev (wearing a "Save the World" T-shirt), and (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Painted vintage print, 1987 Photo: Paquita Escofet Miro  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Top page of folded card numbered “2”. Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BZ62-opc3

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Georgy Guryanov, Igor Verichev (wearing a "Save the World" T-shirt), and (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Painted vintage print, 1987
Photo: Paquita Escofet Miro

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Top page of folded card numbered “2”.
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BZ62-opc3




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Left page (inside) of folded card numbered “2”.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Left page (inside) of folded card numbered “2”.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

Page 2

также интересно узнать, сколько обычно стоит Советское искусство в Америке? И действительно ли оно серьезно кого-либо интересует или это просто мода? У меня сейчас проблема — продавать ли свою живопись или все оставить. Дело в том, что при хороших обстоятельствах, если найти заинтересованных лиц, что можно устроить выставку скажем в Америке или в Европе. Как я тебе уже говорил, я все-еще разрабатываю тему СССР-USA, но, иногда, ухожу и в сторону, включая в живопись Китай, Францию (как в нескольких последних произведениях) и, возможно, так переработаю все самые крупные державы. Именно это сейчас меня интересует особенно! „СПАСЕМ МИР“ — самое модное выражение этого времени и я бы еще добавил „СПАСЕМ ДРУГ ДРУГА“.

Я действительно стал много работать и знаешь почему, как это ни странно, из-за того, что кроме искусства у меня ничего нет (даже тебя рядом), эта позиция обвязывает меня




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Right page (inside) of folded card numbered “2”.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Right page (inside) of folded card numbered “2”.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University


Page 2

делать все больше и больше новых вещей. И если я не рисую день, два, три, то начинаю чувствовать себя разбитым и больным. Что это, особенное состояние всех творческих личностей, их удел, муки творчества или только мой серьезный подход к своей работе? Недавно, несколько дней подряд, был такое жуткое состояние, был в квартире один и мне казалось, действительно, было так, что за мной кто-то наблюдает, что кто-то есть еще в других комнатах, слышались шаги и шорохи, и когда я почувствовал, что за спиной у меня кто-то стоит – я решил, что схожу с ума. Трудно было обернуться назад и проверить себя. Может быть в те ночные часы у меня волосы стояли дыбом, как стальные прутья. Как мозг, я знал, что нахожусь один, на как чувство, все больше и больше был уверен в 




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Left page (outside) of folded card numbered “2”.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Left page (outside) of folded card numbered “2”.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

Page 2

своем временном помешательстве. Сейчас все хорошо, но если это повторится, я не знаю что буду делать, буду кричать!

Я рад, что наконец решила и стала серьезно заниматься Русской историей и литературой. Теперь ты сможешь лучше понимать меня и особенно нашу жизнь. Если ты думаешь о будущем, то думай о России! Я сожалею о том, что ты не могла приехать сюда в этом году, хотя и хотела. Если бы я мог, я бы сам приехал к тебе. Скучаю по тебе и часто ты мне очень нужна здесь. Например, этим летом мы бы прекрасно провели свое время оба. Загорав на пляже здесь лучше — народу меньше и солнце ближе, а чем меньше народу тем его (солнце) остается больше для тебя. 

(Густав, Игорь и я)




 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov Georgy Guryanov and Igor Verichev Painted vintage print, 1987  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Top page of folded card numbered “3”. Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BZ65-opc3

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov
Georgy Guryanov and Igor Verichev
Painted vintage print, 1987

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Top page of folded card numbered “3”.
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-BZ65-opc3




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Left page (inside) of folded card numbered “3”.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Left page (inside) of folded card numbered “3”.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University


Page 3

Съездили бы на международный кинофестиваль в Москву, он проходил этим летом. Я смотрел несколько Американских фильмов оттуда — „ Рэгтайм“, „All that Jazz“ и „Дэнди-крокодил“, Немецкий — „Око за Око“, и Французскую кинокомедию с Депардье и Пьером Ришаром в главных ролях —  „Беглецы“. Сейчас стали чаше появляться Американские фильмы на наших экранах и уже ведутся переговоры а том, чтобы открыть в Москве и Ленинграде специальные кинотеатры, в которых будут идти только Американские фильмы, и тоже самое в Vashington и New York. Ну а после переговоров Рейган — Горбачев, культурный обмен (хотелось бы надеяться) окончательно наладится. (Вообще сейчас поступило хорошее время здесь, происходят различные новые события). Намечается большой обмен между нашими (СССР-USA) музеями и Европой тоже. И как пример – в Москве открылась первая персональная выставка Shagall (в Пушкинском музее),




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Right page (inside) of folded card numbered “3”.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Right page (inside) of folded card numbered “3”.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University


Page 3

с момента его эмиграции во Францию. Также открывается новый музей для частных коллекций и многое коллекционеры из Америки дарят туда части своих коллекций, как например Арнолд Хаммер и другие.

Совсем недавно приезжали Американские музыканты такие как Pat Metheny и Billy Joel. Было интересно смотреть Billy в выступлении по TV. Знаешь, у нас есть такая популярная передача с названием „Музыкальный Ринг“. Это маленькая площадка для музыкантов в центре зала, вокруг которой сидят зрители, как в боксе, почти спорт. И после каждой песни зрители начинают „бить“ своими вопросами музыкантов. Обычно музыканты, Советские музыканты, стараются больше играть музыку, чтобы меньше получить ударов-вопросов от слушателей, т. к. вопросы бывают самые острые, но Joel сделал все наоборот. В cамом начале, он



(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Left page (outside) of folded card numbered “3”.  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Left page (outside) of folded card numbered “3”.

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

Page 3

сказал, что предпочитает больше разговаривать чем петь и что песни это деньги – и это было сильным ударом послушателям, к такому обращению у нас не привыкли. Он отлично провел свой музыкальный бой, но самым смешным для меня было то, когда в самом разгаре зрительских вопросов, когда все вошли во вкус и хотели все больше и больше говорить с ним, он вдруг встал и сказал, что его врач и менеджер советуют ему пойти отдохнуть и прекратить этот спектакль. Такого здесь никто не ожидал, этот хитрый удар с его стороны  был О.К., я даже закричал: „Ура!“ И ве оказались в ногдауне, особенно ведущий телепередачи, тем более, что это передачу у нас ведет почему-то женщина. И тут все зрители захлопали, смущенно улыбались своему проигрышу. Америка победила в этом музыкальном бою.

Вчера ходил ночью в

(Густав и Игорь)




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  “ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.  On the wall: a painting by Sergei Bugaev, Oleg Kotelnikov and Andrei Krisanov  Vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987 Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 4  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y068-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

“ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.
On the wall: a painting by Sergei Bugaev, Oleg Kotelnikov and Andrei Krisanov
Vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987
Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 4

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y068-op
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 4  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y068-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 4

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y068-op

Page 4

наш Петергофский кинотеатр на Американский фильм „Пролетая над гнездом кукушки“. Ты смотрела этот фильм? Игра фильма происходит в сумасшедшем доме — таких фильмов на Советском экране нет. Зал был полный и с интересом провел три своих свободных часа вместе со всеми зрителями. Потом видел еще один фильм этого [режиссера] Milos Forman „Amadeus“ о Моцарте и Сальери.

Да, забыл рассказать, скоро у нас будет еще одна выставка в Швеции — Stockholm и ведутся переговоры с Францией и Англией. Но меня, откровенно говоря, больше интересует




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  “ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.  On the wall: a painting by Sergei Bugaev. See exhibition "The New from Leningrad", Stockholm, 1988 more >> Vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987 Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 5  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y068-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

“ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.
On the wall: a painting by Sergei Bugaev. See exhibition "The New from Leningrad", Stockholm, 1988 more >>
Vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987
Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 5

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y068-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 5 Reverse of vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y069-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 5
Reverse of vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y069-op

Page 5

поле для выставочной деятельности в USA — чем-то эта страна мне импонирует больше, возможно, своим размахом и остротой жизни. Что ты мне можешь предложить на этот счет?

И вот, наверное последнее в этом письме. Я пока не знаю как к этому относиться с юридической точки зрения, необходим твой совет и как юриста, и как человека, который живет в другом мире. Первое — в Англии, в Liverpool, вышла пластинка с названием „Insect Culture“ группа Popular Mechanics, 1987 год, записана на студии ARK  (P.O. Box 45, Liverpool L69 2LE),




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  “ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987. Left: Timur Novikov's work "Stockholm"; right: not identified Vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987 Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 6  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y070-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

“ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.
Left: Timur Novikov's work "Stockholm"; right: not identified.
Vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987
Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 6

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y070-op
  (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 6 Reverse of vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y070-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 6
Reverse of vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y070-op

Page 6

с моей работой на обложке конверта. И второе — в журнале „BLITZ“ July 1987, есть еще одна моя фотография, но без указания авторства, посвященная рекламе этого альбома (четвертый слева на фотографии — это Игорь, ты его помнишь, мы были вместе в ресторане, когда ты была последний раз у меня, в Ленинграде. Он один из тех, кто работал под этой пластинкой). Это фото было снято в интересной обстановке. Мы гуляли по Невскому проспекту, летом, в страшную жару и, конечно, встали в очередь на уличный автомат с газированной водой. И все люди, что стояли в очереди, тоже вошли




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  “ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.  Timur Novikov, holding an inflatable dragon, is standing next to (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov's painting "Timur on Horseback" from 1985, the logotype for the exhibition "The New from Leningrad", Stockholm, 1988 more >> On the left, painted directly on the wall, is a sample of Inal Savchenkov’s figurative graffiti art.  Vintage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987 Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 7  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y071-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

“ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.
Timur Novikov, holding an inflatable dragon, is standing next to (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov's painting "Timur on Horseback" from 1985, the logotype for the exhibition "The New from Leningrad", Stockholm, 1988 more >>
On the left, painted directly on the wall, is a sample of Inal Savchenkov’s figurative graffiti art.

Vintage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987
Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 7

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y071-op
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 7 Reverse of vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y071-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 7
Reverse of vintage print, 9 x 13.6 cm, 1987

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y071-op

Page 7

в мою съемку. Ты их увидишь на фото. Первый мужчина, слева, там, это Курехин. В тексте на конверте написано, что он автор всей музыки — это ошибка, т. к. все тексты и понятные мелодии, за исключением шумов и саксофона — работа Игоря и Валерия („Новые композиторы“, я тебе уже писал, что очень люблю их работу) *  Концерты Популярной Механики (Popular Mechanics), самые популярные, сейчас, в Ленинграде, но если бы они только состояли из шумов Курехина и без шоу,  артистического шоу, художников, то вся его работа была бы совсем скучной. Курехин  – это прежде всего организатор, в этом отношении его творчество делает здесь большие шаги!

* Я хочу, чтобы ты четко поняла, что именно я люблю в этой музыкальной работе. Это прежде всего театральная свободная игра с текстом, свобода в

Around of my painting




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  “ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987. Two paintings by Sergei Bugaev (?)  Vintage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987 Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 8  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y072-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

“ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov's studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.
Two paintings by Sergei Bugaev (?)
Vintage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987
Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Reverse of page 8

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y072-op
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 8 Reverse of intage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y072-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 8
Reverse of intage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y072-op

Page 8

его подаче слушателю , те повторы слов и звуков, и отдельные мелодии тоже. Но в целом вся работа, вся композиция пластинки была проделана Курехиным. Почему? Как уже тебе писал раньше, он организатор и имеет связи с некоторыми западными студиями грамзаписи. „Новые композиторы“ дали ему свою черновую работу и он сделал по своему вкусу то, что ты сможешь услышать. Уверен, что если бы у „Новых композиторов“ такие же связи, как у Курехина, они бы сделали эту работу в 1 000 000 раз лучше (и сейчас они уже работают отдельно от Курехина). Но то что сделано — это уже сделано, ничего




(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  “ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov’s studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.  O the wall: "Lenignrad-Stockhom", a painting by Sergei Bugaev (?) Vintage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987 Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 9  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y073-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

“ASSA Gallery”, Timur Novikov’s studio on Voinov Street (present-day Shpalernaya), 1986 or 1987.
O the wall: "Lenignrad-Stockhom", a painting by Sergei Bugaev (?)
Vintage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987
Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 9

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y073-op
 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 9 Reverse of vintage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987  Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University  E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y073-op

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Letter N to Catherine Mannick, autumn 1987. Page 9
Reverse of vintage print, 13.6 x 9 cm, 1987

Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection, Harvard University

E-E archival number: E-E-pho-Y073-op

Page 9

сейчас не исправишь.

Теперь то, что я бы хотел узнать у тебя относительно юридической стороны моей работы . Если я не подписал контракт со студией „ARK“ до выхода пластинки и с журналом „BLITZ“ — то я не получаю гонорар за свою работу? Или это еще можно исправить? И если можно, то каким образом?

Ну вот, пока и все. Целую и обнимаю,

твой Женя.

P.S. Если подвернется случай сотрудничества с какой-то (интересной!) музыкальной или художественной культурой Америки для меня, то сообщи мне. При случае, поищи для меня 

автоматический фотоаппарат со встроенной вспышкой. Здесь эту вещь нельзя достать нигде.

(картина Тимруа,  ты его видишь на фото 7)




USA-CCCP. Points of Contact.
Part 1: Introduction
Synopsis • Preliminary Remarks
1. From Leningrad to Boston and Back
2. Let’s Talk About Art. New Wave, New Artists, and B(L)ack art
3. Perestroika Emissaries
4. The End of Censorship
5. “It Seems I Need a Manager.” The Impact of Getting Popular
6. Leningrad Artists and Musicians in E-E Kozlov's Pictures
— The River of Forgetfulness, 1988 —
Part 2: Letters
Letter A (1979) – Halloween
Letter B (1980) – To Be at Peace with Yourself
Letter C (1980) – Harlequin
Letter D (1982) – The Sea and the Countryside
Letter E (1983) – Saigon
Letter F (1983) – Moscow
Letter G (1984) – New Wave
Letter H (1985) – New Composers
Letter I (1986) – Happy New Year at the Leningrad Rock Club
Letter J (1986) – CCCP-USA
Letter K (1986) – The Price of Art
Letter L (1986) – B (L)ack art • PoPs from the USSSR
Letter M (1986) – A Taste for Colours
Letter N (1987) – Part 1: Changes and Challenges
Letter N (1987) – Part 2: ASSA
Letter O (1988) – Joanna Stingray's Wedding
Letter P (1989) – Perestroika Hot News
Letter Q (1989) – Russkoee Polee • The Russian Field
Letter R (1990) – New Classicals
Epilogue: USA-CCCP. Points of Contact (Forthcoming)

see also
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, Catherine Mannick, and Hannelore Fobo papers, 1979-2022 (inclusive)
Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies Special Collection Harvard University>>

Published 18 September 2023
Last updated 12 June 2024