E-Ev.g.e.n.i.j ..K.o.z.l.o.     Berlin                                                  


      E-E Evgenij Kozlov: art

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

Часослов
The Book of Hours
Das Stundenbuch

2005


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov  The Book of Hours


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov

The Book of Hours at Hannah Barry Gallery, 2015 >>

18 graphic works, 39 x 22. 5 cm and one diptych 39 x 45 cm,

mixed media, paper, 2005

Inv.no. E-E 205010 - 205028


The Book of Hours

Das Stundenbuch

“The Book of Hours” is a series from 2005 consisting of 20 graphic works, two of them forming a diptych. They are drawn on pages from a Часослов (Chasoslov / Horologion) from the 18th or 19th century. A Chasoslov or Book of Hours is an Orthodox liturgical book containing canonical hours – Church Slavonic prayers to be said at fixed intervals. These include troparia – short hymns printed without notes.

Evgenij Kozlov found the original book in a ruined church in his mother’s village, where he used to spend his summer holidays. The book is printed with the traditional semi-ustav font of ecclesiastical books, a particularly appealing Cyrillic font based on handwritten letterforms, with slightly rounded vertical stems, elongations, and superscript marks.

read the text >>

„Das Stundenbuch“ ist eine Folge von zwanzig Grafiken aus dem Jahr 2005; zwei der Grafiken bilden ein Diptychon. Die Blätter der Grafiken stammen aus einem Часослов (Chasoslov, Horologion oder Stundenbuch) aus dem 18. oder 19. Jahrhundert. Das Chasoslov enthält die sogenannten Stundengebete der orthodoxen Kirche, die zu bestimmten Zeiten gebetet werden, sowie die Troparia, kurze Hymnen, die ohne Noten gedruckt werden.

Evgenij Kozlov fand dieses Buch in einer verlassenen Kirche im Dorf seiner Mutter, wo er die Sommerferien verbrachte. Das Buch ist mit dem traditionellen semi-ustav Schrifttyp, der Halbunziale kirchenslawischer Schriften gedruckt. Der Semi-Ustav ist ein ausgesprochen dekorativer kyrillischer Font, der aus der Handschrift abgeleitet wurde, wie man an den leicht abgerundeten, zum Teil überlangen senkrechten Linien und den oberhalb der Buchstaben angeordneten Zeichen sehen kann.

zum Text >>

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Исправление / Conversion E-E-205010 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Исправление / Conversion E-E-205010

Исправление. / Conversion.

E-E-205010


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Стих / Verse E-E-205011 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Стих / Verse E-E-205011
Стих. / Verse.

E-E-205011


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Песнь / Song E-E-205012 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Песнь / Song E-E-205012
Песнь. / Song.

E-E-205012


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Солнце / Sun E-E-205013 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Солнце / Sun E-E-205013
Солнце. / Sun.

E-E-205013


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Избавление / Salvation E-E-205014 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Избавление / Salvation E-E-205014
Избавление. / Salvation.

E-E-205014


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Из тли и червяка последнего, хотя и червяк и тля первичнее меня, желаю превратиться в Еву. / From the aphid and the last worm, although the worm and the aphid came before me, I wish to turn into Eve. E-E-205015 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Из тли и червяка последнего, хотя и червяк и тля первичнее меня, желаю превратиться в Еву. / From the aphid and the last worm, although the worm and the aphid came before me, I wish to turn into Eve. E-E-205015
Из тли и червяка последнего, хотя и червяк и тля первичнее меня, желаю превратиться в Еву. / From the aphid and the last worm, although the worm and the aphid came before me, I wish to turn into Eve.

E-E-205015


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: С горних слава до конца, а ныне. / Glory from the mountainous to the end, and these days. E-E-205016 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: С горних слава до конца, а ныне. / Glory from the mountainous to the end, and these days. E-E-205016
С горних слава до конца, а ныне. / Glory from the mountainous to the end, and these days.

E-E-205016


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Стих / Verse E-E-205017 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Стих / Verse E-E-205017
Стих. / Verse.

E-E-205017


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: В Е-Ё РЕКЕ / IN HE-ER RIVER E-E-205018 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: В Е-Ё РЕКЕ / IN HE-ER RIVER E-E-205018
В Е-Ё РЕКЕ. / IN HE-ER RIVER.

E-E-205018


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Всем / For all E-E-205019 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Всем / For all E-E-205019
Всем. / For all.

E-E-205019


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Слава / Glory E-E-205020 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Слава / Glory E-E-205020
Слава. / Glory.

E-E-205020


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: И ныне образ / And these days the image E-E-205021 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: И ныне образ / And these days the image E-E-205021
И ныне образ. / And these days the image.

E-E-205021


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Стих. / Verse. E-E-205022 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Стих. / Verse. E-E-205022
Стих. / Verse.

E-E-205022


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Благостию. / With Kindness. E-E-205023 (left part of diptych) (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Провести / Conducting E-E-205023 (right part of diptych)
Благостию. / With Kindness.

E-E-205023 (left part of diptych)


Провести. / Conducting.

E-E-205023 (right part of diptych)

(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: E-E-205023 (left part of diptych) (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: E-E-205023 (right part of diptych)

E-E-205023 (left part of diptych)


E-E-205023 (right part of diptych)
(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Но. / But. E-E-205024 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Но. / But. E-E-205024
Но. / But.

E-E-205024


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: И где. / And where. E-E-205025  И где. / And where. E-E-205025
И где. / And where.

E-E-205025


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: И ныне. / And these days. E-E-205026 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: И ныне. / And these days. E-E-205026
И ныне. / And these days.

E-E-205026


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Ведомо. / Known. E-E-205027 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Ведомо. / Known. E-E-205027
Ведомо. / Known.

E-E-205027


(E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Песнь / Song E-E-205028 (E-E) Evgenij Kozlov, from the book of Hours: Песнь / Song E-E-205028
Песнь / Song

E-E-205028


The Book of Hours

“The Book of Hours” is a series from 2005 consisting of 20 graphic works, two of them forming a diptych. They are drawn on pages from a Часослов (Chasoslov / Horologion) from the 18th or 19th century. A Chasoslov or Book of Hours is an Orthodox liturgical book containing canonical hours – Church Slavonic prayers to be said at fixed intervals. These include troparia – short hymns printed without notes.

Evgenij Kozlov found the original book in a ruined church in his mother’s village, where he used to spend his summer holidays. The book is printed with the traditional semi-ustav font of ecclesiastical books, a particularly appealing Cyrillic font based on handwritten letterforms, with slightly rounded vertical stems, elongations, and superscript marks. The stiff paper has numerous signs of wear, including wax drips, folds and torn edges, and the overall impression is one of a precious artefact from the past.

Attracted by this treasure, Evgenij Kozlov first used it for a series of drawings as long ago as 1982. It inspired him to create Biblical scenes similar to medieval religious miniatures, rendered with bright colours, and covering the entire page.

The series from 2005 is different. The background for the motifs is produced with pastose white paint, which allows some of the text beneath to come through. It provides a soft contrast to the yellowed paper, still visible at the margins. Specific letters, words or sentences from the text are picked out by leaving the area blank.

They stand in contrast to the swift sepia brush strokes of the drawing, which intensify the tone of the margins and reflect the words printed in red. A few bright colours including red, gold and silver, add volume and depth. On the reverse, the text shows patterns from the paper’s absorption of the sepia colour, but it still remains entirely readable.

As in 1982, the artist carefully selected the sheet that inspired the composition from looking at the isolated word that appears on the bottom right of the page: “Песнь“ (Song), „Солнце“ (Sun), „Избавление“ (Salvation) “И ныне“ (And these days), Благостию (With kindness), among others. In most cases the words have also become the title of the respective work.

With a few exceptions, each composition is characterised by a masculine or feminine figure. Halos, feathers, wings, and beams of light mark them out as celestial figures, but with their dynamic movements they also address our world. The figure of a man in the drawing, “Стих“ (stikh / verse), steps forward with a powerful, all-embracing gesture, which is accentuated by red brushstrokes ascending from his arm like flames. His mysterious face resembles a skull, and in what looks like his teeth, a word from the text has been isolated.

‘Есть’ (yest’) can be translated both as ‘to eat’ and as ‘to be’ in the sense of “exist”. Note that In Russian, the combination of “есть“ with the first person singular “Я есть“ (Ya est’ / I am), is the equivalent of the Greek  “ἐγώ εἰμί” (ego eimi). It represents, in an ontological sense, a being gaining consciousness of itself. In a Christian context, it stands for the affirmation of one's very substance (the "I") as being an individual form of the Divine.

However, “eat” is just as metaphysical. It defines a metamorphosis, the assimilation of one substance by another, but in a deeper sense stands for the transubstantiation, the spiritual aspect of metabolism encapsulated in the Holy Communion of the Christian mass.

One rather intriguing title is: “Из тли и червяка последнего, хотя и червяк и тля первичнее меня, желаю превратиться в Еву.” “From the aphid and the last worm, although the worm and the aphid came before me, I wish to turn into Eve.” The title refers to the two words ‘Из тли’ — ‘Iz tli’ / ‘from the aphid’ at the bottom of the page and plays with the contrast of the words ‘last’ and ‘before’ / ‘primary’. Two other visible fragments of the text are ‘и’ (‘i’ / ‘and’), ‘бы’ (‘by’ / ‘if’), which results in the phrase: ‘and if from an aphid’.

The composition is very melodious. It shows Eve with a red wing and a halo swaying into the image, and cutting into a horizon that ends in spirals, like a violin clef. Above her head a dashed line points to an indefinable object, and if we turn over the leaf, we read the caption: ‘тля’ (aphid). As it happens, ‘Из тли’ can be rendered into modern Russian quite differently, namely as, ‘из тления’, meaning ‘from decay’. But the aphid excites our visual imagination, removes religious pathos, and, with the worm, makes a strange and curious pair.

The last drawings from the “Book of Hours” present us with an unexpected thematic change. They show military vehicles — tanks with surface-to-air missiles, trucks, an ambulance with wings and red crosses. Several large ‘E-E’ symbols are applied to them. War and death are, of course, also an effect of divine forces, but these graphic works, beautiful with their laconic humour, are somewhat disturbing. The last drawing, a feminine figure with a corona, calms our uneasiness.

Hannelore Fobo, 2013/2015


up


Часослов“ / „Das Stundenbuch“

„Das Stundenbuch“ ist eine Folge von zwanzig Grafiken aus dem Jahr 2005; zwei der Grafiken bilden ein Diptychon. Die Blätter der Grafiken stammen aus einem Часослов (Chasoslov, Horologion oder Stundenbuch) aus dem 18. oder 19. Jahrhundert. Das Chasoslov enthält die sogenannten Stundengebete der orthodoxen Kirche, die zu bestimmten Zeiten gebetet werden, sowie die Troparia, kurze Hymnen, die ohne Noten gedruckt werden.

Evgenij Kozlov fand dieses Buch in einer verlassenen Kirche im Dorf seiner Mutter, wo er die Sommerferien verbrachte. Das Buch ist mit dem traditionellen semi-ustav Schrifttyp, der Halbunziale kirchenslawischer Schriften gedruckt. Der Semi-Ustav ist ein ausgesprochen dekorativer kyrillischer Font, der aus der Handschrift abgeleitet wurde, wie man an den leicht abgerundeten, zum Teil überlangen senkrechten Linien und den oberhalb der Buchstaben angeordneten Zeichen sehen kann. Das steife Papier weist wellige, stellenweise eingerissene Ränder auf. Weitere Alterserscheinungen sind zahlreiche Wachsspuren. So entsteht der Eindruck eines kostbaren Zeugnisses der Vergangenheit. 

Bereits 1982 hat sich Evgenij Kozlov von diesem Schatz zu einer Serie von Grafiken anregen lassen. Es entstanden Miniaturgemälde, die in Motiv und Farbigkeit an die Tradition der durch Illuminatoren ausgeschmückten Bibeln erinnern. Sie bedecken die Blätter fast komplett.

Die Serie von 2005 unterscheidet sich davon. Der Textblock der Blattvorderseiten ist mit weißer Gouache übermalt, durch den der Text teilweise durchschimmert. So bildet sich ein sanfter Kontrast zum vergilbten Papier, das am Blattrand sichtbar bleibt. Einzelne Buchstaben, Wörter oder Sätze bleiben aus der Übermalung ausgespart.

Sie kontrastieren mit den rasch aufgetragenen sepiafarbenen Pinselstrichen der Grafik, welche den Ton der Ränder intensivieren und gleichzeitig die rotgedruckten Worte reflektieren. Sparsam verwendete, kräftige Farben, darunter Rot, Gold und Silber, verleihen den Motiven Volumen und Tiefe. Der Text auf der Rückseite hat den Farbauftrag der Vorderseite zum Teil absorbiert, bleibt dabei aber komplett lesbar.

Wie schon 1982 wählte der Künstler für seine Grafiken jedes einzige Blatt sorgfältig aus. Dabei ließ er sich wiederum von dem einzeln stehenden Wort rechts unten auf der Seite inspirieren, darunter „Песнь“ (Lied), „Солнце“ (Sonne), „Избавление“ (Rettung) „И ныне“ (Und in diesen Tagen), „Благостию“ (Mit Güte). In der Regel wurden diese Wörter jeweils auch zum Titel der Grafik.

Mit wenigen Ausnahmen wird jedes Blatt von einer männlichen oder weiblichen Figur bestimmt. An ihren verschiedenen Attributen – Flügel, ein feurige Aura, Pfauenfedern, Heiligenscheine, Strahlenbündel – kann man erkennen, dass es sich um himmlische Figuren handelt, die aber sehr lebendig auftreten, ausgesprochen dynamisch und weltzugewandt. Die männliche Figur in „Стих“ (stikh / Vers) schreitet mir einer mächtigen, allumfassenden Geste nach vorne, was durch die roten Pinselstriche verstärkt wird, die wie Flammen aus seinen Armen lodern. Sein mysteriöses Gesicht hat Züge eines Totenkopfes, und was aussieht wie seine Zähne, ist tatsächlich ein Wort, welches aus dem Text ausgespart wurde.

„Есть“ (yest’) kann sowohl als „essen“ als auch als „sein“ im Sinne von „existieren“ übersetzt werden. Im Russischen ist die Verbindung von „Есть“ mit der ersten Person Singular „Я есть“ (Ya est’ / Ich bin), das Äquivalent des Griechischen „ἐγώ εἰμί” (ego eimi). Es steht ontologisch für den Beginn des Erlangens von Selbstbewusstsein. Im christlichen Kontext ist es die Bejahung der eigenen Substanz (des „Ich“) als einer individuellen Form des Göttlichen.

Andererseits ist „essen“ nicht weniger metaphysisch. Es definiert eine Metamorphose, die Assimilation einer Substanz durch eine andere, steht aber in einer tieferen Beziehung zur Transsubstantiation, dem geistigen Aspekt des Stoffwechsels, welcher in die heilige Kommunion der christlichen Messe eingeschlossen ist.

Merkwürdig und komisch ist die lange Bezeichnung des 6. Blattes. Evgenij Kozlov hat sie aus dem aus dem Anfangswort „Из тли“ (Aus der Blattlaus) weiterentwickelt: „Из тли и червяка последнего, хотя и червяк и тля первичнее меня, желаю превратиться в Еву.“ (Aus der letzten Blattlaus und dem letzten Wurm, obwohl es den Wurm und die Blattlaus früher als mich gegeben hat, will ich mich in Eva verwandeln). Der Titel bezieht sich auf die beiden Wörter „Из тли“ — „Iz tli“ / „von der Blattlaus“ — am unteren Rand der Seite und spielt mit dem Gegensätzen von „letzter“ und „früher“. Zwei weitere nicht übermalte Textelemente sind „и’ (i / and), „бы“ (by / if), was zur Aussage „und wenn von der Blattlaus” führt.

Die Komposition ist tänzerisch-musikalisch. Sie zeigt Eva mit einem roten Flügel und einem Heilgenschein, wie sie ins Bild hereinweht und dabei die Horizontlinie durchbricht. Deren beide Enden sind gegenläufig eingedreht – spiralförmig, wie bei einem Violinschlüssel. Über Evas Kopf zeigt eine punktierte Linie zu einem undefinierbaren Objekt, und wenn wir das Blatt umdrehen, lesen wir die Bezeichnung „тля“ (Blattlaus). Allerdings kann „Из тли“ in modernes Russisch auch ganz anders übersetzt werden, nämlich als „из тления“ — „vom Verfall“. Aber die Laus regt unsere bildliche Fantasie an, löscht das religiöse Pathos und bildet mit dem Wurm ein seltsames und interessantes Paar.

Im letzten Drittel des „Stundenbuches“ kommt es zu einem überraschenden thematischen Wechsel. Auf diesen Grafiken sehen wir Kriegsfahrzeuge: Panzer als Raketenträger, Lastwagen, ein Krankenwagen mit Flügeln und rotem Kreuzen. Mehrere große „E-E“ – Symbole finden sich hier. Auch Kampf und Tod sind Wirkungen göttlicher Mächte, und diese Darstellungen sind nicht weniger ästhetisch, dabei lakonisch und humorvoll. Doch bleibt doch ein irritierendes Gefühl, das erst durch die letzte Grafik, einer weiblichen Figur, die einen Strahlenkranz betrachtet, wieder beruhigt wird.

Hannelore Fobo, 2013 / 2015

nach oben